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Tlie Chic^ Cluster of Theological Schools 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1974 - 1975 



Office of the Coordinator 
1100 East 55th Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60615 
Phone: (312) 667-3500 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Foreword 3 

Common Academic Calendar 4 

Member Schools 5 

Cluster Areas of Concentration 9 

Personal Transformation 11 

Social Transformation 13 

Celebration 15 

Cross Cultural Communication 18 

Cluster Area of Cooperative Instruction 20 

Cluster Day Course Offerings 23 

Course Listings 27 

Old Testament Studies 27 

New Testament Studies 28 

Biblical Languages 29 

Jewish Studies 30 

Theology and Philosophy 30 

Historical Studies 33 

Christian Ethics 35 

Pastoral Care and Ministry 37 

World Mission and Ecumenics 39 

Worship and Preaching 39 

Christian Education 41 

Faculty 42 

Announcements 53 

Library Services 53 

Center for Advanced Study in Religion and Science 54 

Center for Studies in Religious Education 54 

Chicago Center for Black Religious Studies 55 

Cross Cultural and World Mission Studies Program 56 

Theological Language Courses 56 



FOREWORD 



The eight member institutions of the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools 
look upon their cooperative structure as more than a coordinating instrumentality. 
Beyond the mere sharing of their considerable educational resources, improved 
library services, personal enrichment through contact with men and women of 
other churches, a wide variety of courses and field placements, and outstanding 
guest lecturers, clustering makes it possible to develop new and creative curri- 
cular models which lie beyond the capacity of any single school to mount and 
which draw on the particular strengths of the participating schools. 

The four Areas of Concentration which were launched during the 1973-74 
academic year, are an example of such creative curricular models (see pp. 9-19). 
The response of students and faculty who were involved in these Areas of Con- 
centration was generally positive and enthusiastic. These interdisciplinary and 
interinstitutional models offer students a new experience in their preparation for 
ministry in contemporary society. During the 1974-75 school year, a curricular 
task force will plan three additional Areas in Interpretation and Communication 
of the Christian message as it relates to Preaching, Teaching, and Media and the 
Arts. 

In addition, a planning committee has submitted proposals relative to inter- 
professional education, an ecumenical field education pilot project, cooperative 
foundational instruction and long-range faculty development. 

Along with the Doctor of Ministry programs recently launched by some of the 
member schools, plans are moving ahead for a joint academic doctoral degree 
program which will build upon existing programs in two of the schools. 

All these developments may rightly be interpreted as signs of vitality and 
growth within the Chicago Cluster and of the commitment to continue to explore 
new avenues for maximizing the educational potential of the member schools and 
the greater Chicago area. 



Robert J. Flinn, S.V.D. 
Executive Coordinator 



COMMON ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



1974- 1975 



FALL QUARTER 

September A - 21 Biblical Languages Pre-Session Intensives 

September 23-27 Orientation and Late Registration 

September 30 Convocation and Beginning of Classes 

November 28 - December 1 Thanksgiving Recess 

November 18-22 Registration for the Winter Quarter 

December 13 Fall Quarter Ends 

December 14 - January 5 (1975) Christmas Recess 



WINTER QUARTER 

January 6 (1975) Classes Begin (Late Registration) 

February 10-14 Registration for the Spring Quarter 

March 21 Spring Quarter Ends 

March 22-29 Spring Recess 

March 30 Easter Sunday 



SPRING QUARTER 

March 31 Classes Begin (Late Registration) 

April 6-13 World Mission Institute 

May 19-23 Registration for Fall Quarter 

June 6 End of the Spring Quarter 



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The Chic^ Cluster of Theological Schools 



BETHANY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Bethany education is shaped by concerns for such areas as peace, discipleship, true piety, 
and servanthood; seeks to provide a community of scholarship and faith where insistence 
upon academic excellence is balanced by concern for personal growth. Curricular inno- 
vations include colloquium groupings oriented toward the contexts of ministry and a 
credit-noncredit plan of grading. 

President Paul M. Robinson 

Dean Warren F. Groff 

Registrar Carole Loats 

Degree Programs: 

Name of Degree Time Beyond A.B. Normally Required 

M.A. Th. 2 years 

M.Div. 3 years 

D.Min. 

(3 years in ministry required) 9 years 

Butterfield and Meyers Roads 

Oak Brook, Illinois 60521 

(312) 629-2400 



CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION AT CHICAGO 

Catholic Theological Union is a collaborative venture sponsored by several religious 
orders. Autonomous corporation. Ecumenical and university thrust in complex of southside 
Chicago institutions. Emphasis on preparation for ministry, hence flexible academic 
pattern augmented by strong field education program. Membership open to other R.C. and 
all serious students. 

President laull. Bechtold, C.P. 

Dean Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. 

Admissions Officer John Paul, M.S.C. 

Degree Programs: 

Name of Degree Time Beyond A.B. Normally Required 

M.Div. 3—4 years 

* M.Div. with Mission Specialization 3—4 years 
M.A. in Theology 2 years 

5401 South Cornell Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60615 

(312) 324-8000 



CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

A style fostering rigorous theological inquiry and development of student's own intellec- 
tual and professional integrity in an atmosphere of diversity and freedom. Normative pro- ll 
fessional program is the 4 year D.Mino, but the M.A« or MoDiv. may be awarded at 2nd and ^ 
3rd year terminal points for cause. Post M.Div., DoMin. available, full or part-time. Aca- 
demic doctorate is awarded in three areas: Jewish-Christian Studies, Reformation and 
Free Church Studies, Theology and the Study of Man. 

President Charles Shelby Rooks 

^^°" Perry D. LeFevre 

Admissions Officer Robert S. Moore 

Degree Programs: 

Name of Degree Time Beyond A.B. Normally Required 

M.A. in Religious Studies 2 years 

M. Div. 3 years » 

D. Min. 4 years ■ 

D. Th. 6 years 

5757 University Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60637 

(312) 752-5757 



DE ANDREIS SEMINARY 

Owned and conducted by the Vincentian Fathers primarily for preparing priests to serve 
in the various apostolates of their religious community. Students may take part of their 
course work at DePaul University. 

President Francis A. Gaydos, CM. 

Dean , Nicholas E. Persich, CM. 

Admissions Officer William E. Hartenbach, CM. 

Degree Programs: 

Name of Degree Time Beyond A.B. Normally Required 

M.A. 3 years 

DeAndreis Seminary 

511 East 127th Street 

Lemont, Illinois 60439 

(312) 257-5454 



JESUIT SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY IN CHICAGO 

A professional school of ministry stressing an integrated academic-ministerial program, 
sponsored by the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) of the United States. A majority of the stu- jH 
dents are Jesuits, but JSTC is open to all qualified men and women willing to share in * 
free and intelligent exchange of ideas, learning and service. 

President James Hennesey, S.J. 

Dean William G. Thompson, S.J. 

Director of Admissions Joseph J. DeVault, S.J. 

Degree Program: 

Name of Degree Time Beyond A.B. Normally Required: 

M.Div. (Loyola) 3-4 years 



LUTHERAN SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AT CHICAGO 

Preparation for ministry. Curriculum emphasizes (1) the sources, structure, and dynamics 
of the Christian Faith; (2) the expression of that faith in our time. New campus (merger of 
5 seminaries) deliberately located in urban setting adjacent to a major university. 

President Walter F. Wolbrecht 

Dean , Wesley J. Fuerst 

Admissions Officer Wilhelm C. Linss 

Director of Graduate Studies Franklin Sherman 

Degree Programs: 

Name of Degree Time Beyond A.B. Normally Required 

M.Div. 4 years 

M.T.S. 3 years 

M.R.E. 2 years 

D.Min. 7 years 

(3 years in ministry required) 
S.T.M. 6 years 

S.T.D. 8 years 

1100 East 55th Street 

Chicago, Illinois 60615 

(312) 667-3500 



MEADVILLE/LOMBARD THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 

Offering the Doctor of Ministry as the normative professional degree for ministry. Stu- 
dents with earlier graduate study may apply for advanced standing. 

President and Dean Malcolm R. Sutherland, Jr. 

Associate Dean /. Ronald Engel 

Admissions Officer and Dean of Students Neil H. Shadle 

Degree Programs: 

Name of Degree Time Beyond A.B. Normally Required 
M.R.E. 2 years 

D.Min. 4 years 

5701 South Woodlawn Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60637 
(312) 753-3195 



NORTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The seminary was founded by churches of the American Baptist Convention. At the same 
time, it seeks participation in ecumenical dialog, endeavors to serve the whole body of 
Christ, and welcomes students of all Christian traditions. 

President Bryan F. Archibald 

Dean * Robert P. Meye 

Admissions Officer E. Alfred Jenkins 

Degree Programs: 

Name of Degree Time Beyond A.B. Normally Required 
M.A. (Christian Education) 2 years 

M.A. (Theological Studies) 2 years 

M.Div. 3 years 

100 West Butterfield Road 

Oak Brook, Illinois 60521 

(312) 629-4100 



CLUSTER STAFF 

Robert J. Flinn, S.V.D., Executive Coordinator 
Donald F. Williams, Academic Coordinator 
Albert E. Hurd, Library Coordinator 

1100 E. 55th Street 

Chicago, 111. 60615 

(312) 667-3500 



The Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools is incorporated as a Not-For-Profit corporation in the 
State of Illinois, April 26, 1971. 



CLUSTER AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 



INTRODUCTION 

Among a variety of cooperative enterprises, the Cluster offers four unique programs 
of education for ministry which draw in an integrated manner upon the resources of its 
member schools and the metropolitan Chicago area. These four Cluster Areas of Concen- 
tration are Personal Transformation, Social Transformation, Celebration, and Cross-cultural 
Communication. The Cluster also offers a similar and parallel Area of Cooperative Instruc- 
tion, which is described in the next section of this catalog. Brief identification of the 
major aspects of the planning process by which these programs have been developed will 
place each of them in more adequate perspective. 

I. The Mandate for Planning 

The four Areas of Concentration represent the present stage of development in a 
two-year process of long range academic planning which includes the combined ef- 
forts of faculty, students, and staff who accepted the challenge to develop "a plan 
which will make the Cluster more than a 'coordinating instrumentality'" and "a 
blueprint for doing better together what we cannot achieve alone and for creating 
new and better styles of theological education ... or of improving the styles we 
already follow." 

II. The Basis of Planning 

All such planning has incorporated the principle of differential participation at the 
level of both the individual school and the individual student. At the institutional 
level each seminary retains full control over its own academic program, including: 
(1) the determination of the nature, scope, and manner of fulfilling the requirements 
which its own students must complete in their home school; and (2) the determination 
of whether and in what manner it wishes to participate as an institution, or wishes 
its students to participate, in the Cluster areas of concentration. (Differential parti- 
cipation at the level of the individual student will be noted below.) 

III. The Parameters of Planning 

With such a common basis for planning as background, other crucial issues emerged. 
The decisions made regarding these fundamental issues constitute the planning para- 
meters within which the Areas of Concentration have been shaped. 

A. The Curricular Model 

Since each school in the Cluster continues to offer its own introductory and ad- 
vanced requirements related to such matters as denominational and confessional 
identity, spiritual formation, and ordination, the Cluster Areas of Concentration 
are not designed as a core curriculum in which all beginning students in each of 
the schools are expected to participate. Rather, the Areas of Concentration are 
designed as intermediate and advanced elective offerings which are open to stu- 
dents who have completed at least one year of theological education and who 
have satisfied such other prerequisites as may be appropriate in a particular 
Area. 

B. The Organizing Principle 

The Areas of Concentration are designed to transcend the personal and profes- 
sional fragmentation which frequently accompanies educational experiences 
which are circumscribed by a particular discipline or field or by a particular 
ministerial role or setting. Tharrefore, the concentrations have been organized in 
terms of broad areas of functional competence which are relevant to a variety of 
ministerial roles and settings and which are dependent upon the integration of 
performance and insights from a variety of disciplines. 

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C. The Defining Educational Characteristic 

The areas of concentration are designed to foster maximum feasible incorporation 
of the following interfaces: 

1. instructional interface -- integration of insights from a variety of disciplines 
and fields, both classical and practical, through the assistance of faculty 
teams whose members represent such expertise; 

2. contextual inierface -- integration of theory and practice through the utiliza- 
tion of action-reflection styles of learning wherein students engage in and 
reflect upon ministries of various kinds with the assistance of peer consul- 
tation and professional supervision; 

3. formational interface ~ integration of the student's personal identity and 
professional identity, wherein understandings, attitudes, values and skills 
appropriate to each are experienced and perceived as mutually interdepen- 
dent; 

4. professional interface ~ clarification of the student's professional identity 
as minister (e.g., role, status, authority) in relation to members of other pro- 
fessions and occupations which represent corresponding areas of functional 
competence; 

5. ecumenical interface -- inclusion of students and faculty representing di- 
verse theological and ecclesiological traditions; and 

6. institutional interface — inclusion of students and faculty representing two 
or more institutions in the Cluster, and the utilization of institutional re- 
sources outside the Cluster. 

D. The Defining Structural Characteristics 

1. Differential Student Participation 

The Areas of Concentration are designed to be sufficiently flexible to enable 
students with varying degrees of interest and curricular freedom to partici- 
pate in one or more such programs in the pursuit of several types of educa- 
tional and ministerial objectives: 

a. to develop a generalized focus of competence which may (1) serve to in- 
form and enrich other functional competencies required of "general ists" 
in a variety of ministries or (2) serve as a general foundation upon which 
the specialized competence required for ministries in research and schol- 
arship may subsequently be built; 

b. to develop a more specialized focus of competence which may (1) provide 
an organizing center for other areas of competence required of generalists, 
(2) provide necessary preparation for those whose primary, if not exclu- 
sive, form of ministry will correspond to one of the areas of concentration, 
or (3) provide a more specialized foundation upon which the additional 
competencies required of researchers and scholars may be subsequently 
built; and 

c. to develop a more individualized focus of competence which may not cor- 
respond wholly to either of the foregoing patterns but which best serves 
the particular student. 

2. Functional Standardization 

The Areas of Concentration are designed to be sufficiently standardized to 
provide a functional degree of educational coherence and administrative 
compatibility. Three general types of units have been developed: Intensive 
Unit I, Intensive Unit II, and Elective Units. During the current year Inten- 
sive Unit I in each Area of Concentration will be offered, together with one 
Elective Unit. Intensive Unit II and additional Elective Units may be offered 
in subsequent years. The several Units and Elective Unit which will be of- 
fered during the current year are described in the following pages. 

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CCTS 400 PERSONAL TRANSFORMATION: INTENSIVE UNIT I 

Winter Quarter. 1975 Philip A. Anderson 

9 QH Credit Professor of Pastoral Theology 

Wednesday. 9:00 A.M. - 9:00 P.M. Chicago Theological Seminary 

Thursday, 9:00 A.M. - 12:00 Noon Roman R. Vanasse. 0. Praem. 

Enrollment limited to 20 Assistant Professor of Doctrinal 

Theology 

Chicago Theological Union 
Margaret H. Stearn 

Minister. University Church of 

The Disciples of Christ, and 
Co-Director. The Porter Foundation, 
The University of Chicago 

I. Nature of the Unit 

Intensive Unit I is an in-depth experience in a learning-transforming community 
for students who wish to acquire intermediate levels of competence in helping indi- 
viduals and face-to-face groups more fully to actualize their potential through multi- 
faceted growth models. It is envisioned that all students, regardless of their previous 
experience, can grow, try out new ways of behavior for enabling growth, teach others, 
explore new theories and be members of the community. 

The Unit consists of one intensive quarter of involvement for which students 
will receive 9 QH (or 3 units) credit. With the approval of the respective institutions 
in which they are matriculated, students who are involved in the Unit may also en- 
roll in one additional course which does not conflict with the regularly scheduled 
meetings of the Unit. 

Intensive Unit I will fulfill prerequisites for the year-long Intensive Unit II in 
Personal Transformation which may be offered in 1975-76. Intensive Unit II will pro- 
vide students with supervisory hours of credit toward membership in the American 
Association of Pastoral Counselors or the Association for Religion and Applied Be- 
havorial Sciences; however. Intensive Unit I offers no supervisory hours of credit. 

II. Aims of the Unit 

The general aims of Intensive Unit I include the following: 

A. to assist students to develop a pastoral theological theory and research metho- 
dology relative to personal transformation which is grounded in the classical 
theological disciplines (Bible, history, ethics, and theology) and which is inform- 
ed by dialogue with the history of the cure of souls, contemporary theory and 
practice in pastoral counseling and clinical pastoral education, and relevant 
secular disciplines; 

B. to assist students to acquire direct personal experience of selected modes of 
personal transformation; and 

C. to assist students to acquire appropriate levels of competence in the uses of 
various modes of personal transformation. 

III. Structure of the Unit 

There are three principal components in Intensive Unit I: a learning-transforming 
community, ministry placements, and try-out events. 
A. A Learning-Transforming Community 

The faculty and students will be members in a learning-transforming community. 
The process of building such a community will begin with a five-day founding 
experience during January 6-10, 1975. The experience will be held in Green Bay, 
Wisconsin, at the modern Norbertine Abbey, where participants may enjoy private 
rooms, pool, sauna, and spacious acreage. 

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During this time group covenants for the quarter will be developed and theoretical 
and practical inputs will be organized. Individual student covenants, which will 
also be developed at this time, will include the identification of the specific 
personal and professional skills and theoretical understandings on which one 
wants to work during the quarter. With permission of the faculty member(s) in- 
volved, students may also design their individual covenants to include required 
work which they would normally be expected to complete through another course; 
upon fulfillment of their covenants to the satisfaction of the faculty member(s) 
students would have fulfilled all or part of the course requirement. 

During subsequent weeks the total group will meet from 9:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. 
on Wednesdays and from 9:00-12:00 noon on Thursdays, possibly away from the 
Cluster. Sub-groups/learning teams will also work together at other times on 
common interests, projects, theories, skill training, and personal growth. 

The learning-transforming community will be engaged in four continuing activities: 

1. Acquiring and developing theory, content, and skills related to personal 
transformation. 

The theoretical inputs and content on growth and change will be wide-ranging 
and will be dependent upon the covenants established by the individual mem- 
bers and/or group. Illustrative possibilities include: prayer, spiritual direction, 
meditation. Yoga, and demonology; theological understandings of grace, recon- 
ciliation. Christian community, confession, justification, redemption, and ethics; 
the meaning of biblical themes, experiences, and words in the context of per- 
sonal transformation and contemporary life; the relationship between pietism 
and activism— personal and social transformation; theories of personality and 
human development; the human potential movement, including Gestalt Therapy, 
Transactional Analysis, encounter, psychosynthesis, and bio-energetics; and 
therapeutic models such as psychoanalysis and ego-psychology. 

2. Experiencing of one's own growth and of enabling others to grow, both within 
the community and in try-out with others outside. 

3. Reflecting upon the experience and theory. 

4. Evaluating the ongoing process and the life of the community. 

Evaluative decisions will be agreed upon communally within the following gen- 
eral guidelines; a paper or project indicating integration of theory and skills, as 
well as self-evaluation, peer evaluation, and supervisory evaluation, will serve 
as bases for evaluation at the end of the Unit. 



B. Ministry Placements 

It is expected that all students will be involved in some form of ministry which 
provides leadership experience in personal transformation and that such involve- 
ment will be utilized in the Unit. Students without access to such involvements 
will be assisted to find appropriate placement during the quarter in which the 
Unit is offered. Students who desire to do so will also be assisted to find appro- 
priate placement in the quarter preceding the Unit. 



C. Try-out Events 

In addition to the experiences of leadership which are expected of them within 
the Unit and within their respective placements, students will be provided op- 
portunity to become team leaders with faculty members in designing, executing, 
and evaluating short-term personal transformation events for other persons and 
groups. Possibilities for try-outs may include such organizations, groups and 
occasions as the following: Cluster, churches, lay people, house church week- 
ends, spiritual growth weekends, and experiential theology weekends. 



12 



IV. Admission to the Unit 

Open to students (1) who have completed one or more years of theological education; 

(2) who have had some of the following experience and training (one or more quarters 

of Clinical Pastoral Education; laboratory experiences in small groups, personal 

growth, etc.; basic courses in personal counseling and group work); and (3) who have 

obtained the approval both of the school in which they are matriculated and of the 

Personal Transformation teaching team. 

All students who have obtained appropriate approval for admission should register 

for the Unit during the registration period which will be held at each school during 

the week of May 20-24, 1974. 

After having registered, students will become part of the planning process for the 

Unit. 



CCTS 420 SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION: INTENSIVE UNIT I 

Fall Quarter, 1974 and Winter Quarter. 1975 Robert Benne 



12 QH Credit 

Thursday. 9:00 A.M. - 3:30 P.M. 

Enrollment limited to 25 



Associate Professor of Church and 

Society 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

Joseph J. DeVault, S.J. 

Associate Professor of Biblical Theol- 
ogy. 
Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago 

Donald E. Miller 

Professor of Christian Education and 

Ethics, 
Bethany Theological Seminary 
Benjamin F. Reaves 

Associate Professor of Preaching 

and Urban Ministry 
Andrews Univeristy 

Marjorie Tuite, O.P. 

Coordinator of Ministerial Program, 
Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago 

Nature of the Unit 

Intensive Unit I is designed for upper level students who wish to acquire further 
competence in assisting organizations and institutions to become increasingly effec- 
tive in ministering to persons in the light of Judeo-Christian values. It is intended 
both for those who are equipping themselves for ministries with the church as the 
object and agent of social change and for those who are preparing for service in 
agencies of social change other than the church. 

The Unit consists of a two-quarter sequence of involvement for which students 
will receive 12 QH (or 4 units) credit. Credit will be granted only upon successful 
completion of the full sequence. With the approval of the institutions in which they 
are matriculated, students who are involved in the Unit may also enroll in one or two 
additional courses each quarter. 



13 



II. Aims of the Unit 

The general aims of Intensive Unit I include the following: 

A. to assist the student to develop an understanding of the interrelationships between 
Christian faith and the ministry of social transformation, especially as these are 
clarified through the insights of biblical, historical, ethical, and theological disci- 
plines; 

B. to assist students to develop an understanding of the interrelationships between 
social scientific disciplines and the strategy and tactics' of social action; 

C. to assist students to understand the ways in which one's own intrapsychic and 
interpersonal relationships affect a ministry of social change, especially as these 
are illumined within a context of mutual support and criticism; and 

D. to assist students to become insightful and responsible participants in ministries 
of social change within church and community. 

III. Structure of the Unit 

There are three principal components in Intensive Unit I: theoretical presenta- 
tions, supervised ministry placements, and an integrative seminar. 

A. Theoretical Presentations 

The theoretical presentations will deal with four general areas and their inter- 
relationships; tactics and strategy for social change; social theory and voluntary 
associations; the Bible, theology, and social change; and historical and ethical 
analysis of the role of the church in relation to social issues in America. 

B. Supervised Ministry Placements 

Each student will be involved in a ministry of social transformation either in a 
church or in a secular institution, agency or movement which aims at social 
change. Placements are intended to enable students to move from observation, 
through participation, to the assumption of significant responsibility. Supervision 
and evaluation of student activities in the field will be established as part of 
a contract agreement with the staff early in the Fall Quarter. 

In addition to churches placement possibilities include the following: educational 
institutions (public, private, and alternative schools and colleges and universi- 
ties); private and governmental agencies concerned with mental health, medical 
care, racial justice, women's rights, welfare, and housing; penal institutions and 
agencies related to the criminal justice system; The Chicago Center for Black 
Religious Studies; community organizations, financial and investment institu- 
tions; the Alliance to End Repression, etc. 
Repression, etc. 

C. The Integrative Seminar 

Efforts will be made to relate the learnings acquired in the respective theoretical 
presentations and in the supervised ministry placements to one another in the 
integrative seminar. These efforts, in which the full teaching team and all stu- 
dents will participate, will include the development of wholistic understandings 
of the ideological, institutional, interpersonal and intrapsychic factors which are 
facilitating or hindering social change in the students' respective placements. 
Project-reports indicating integration of theoretical and practical data as well as 
evidence of students' ability to function as insightful and responsible partici- 
pants in ministries of social transformation will serve as bases for evaluation 
at the end of the Unit. 

14 



( 



I 



"It is anticipated that students' involvement in the program during the two quarters will 
average between 15 and 20 hours per week, including class time, study, and ministry 
responsibilities. 



IV. Admission 

Open to students who have completed two or more years of theological education and 
who have obtained the approval of the school in which they are matriculated. 
Open also to others with backgrounds in theological and sociological disciplines 
and/or in social change experience who have completed one year of theological edu- 
cation and who have also obtained the approval both of the school in which they are 
matriculated and of the Social Transformation teaching team. 

All students who have obtained appropriate approval for admission should register 
for the Unit during the registration period which will be held at each school during 
the week of May 20-24, 1974. 



CCTS440 CELEBRATION: INTENSIVE UNIT I 



Winter Quarter. 1975 
9QH Credit 

Monday. 3:00-9:00 p.m. 
Thursday. 9:00-4:00 p.m. 
Enrollment limited to 25 



Oscar J. Miller, CM. 

Professor of Communications 
DeAndreis Seminary 

James K. Serrick, S.J. 

Instructor in Pastoral Care and Spirit- 
uality 
Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago 



Ross Snyder 

Professor of Religious Education 
Chicago Theological Seminary 

Henry J. Piacitelli, CM. 

Director of Training in Pastoral Works 
DeAndreis Seminary 



'• Intensive Unit I is an experience in a learning-celebrating community for the ad- 
vanced student who wishes to become an ARTIST-INTERPRETER-INSTIGATOR of reli- 
gious celebration. The phrase "artist-interpreter-instigator" indicates that the objec- 
tives of the Unit go beyond assisting the student to acquire the ability to function as 
leader of public worship which is characteristically expected of all ministers. The 
phrase "religious celebration" includes both the traditional forms of worship and 
also para liturgical and other forms of communal celebration in the Judeo-Christian 
tradition. 



15 



The Unit consists of one intensive quarter of involvement for which students will 
receive 9QH (or 3 units) credit. With the approval of the respective institutions in 
which they are matriculated, students who are involved in the Unit may also enroll 
in one additional course which does not conflict with the regularly-scheduled meet- 
ings of the Unit. 

II. Aims of the Unit 

The general aim of Intensive Unit I is to assist the student to engage in the crucial 
acts of becoming/growing as an artist-interpreter-instigator, viz.: 

A. to experience and comprehend how communal celebration bursts out of a people 
from the events of their common life, and from intensive lived moments of individ- 
ual persons; 

B. to experience communal celebration as a mobilization of expressive arts and 
spontaneity; and 

C. to learn to share in the common experience and felt understandings of an actual 
people, especially the People of God, in such a way as to enable them to trans- 
form their lived moments into communal symbol and fresh communal celebration. 

III. Structure of the Unit 

There are four principal strands in Intensive Unit I: expressive arts, basic theory 
of celebration, clinical experience, and reflection and evaluation. The ministerial 
preparation of the student will be integrated in terms of these strands through the 
use of various theological and non-theological disciplines and various educational 
methodologies. 

A. Expressive Arts 

The expressive arts will engage and be engaged by the community through two 
related avenues: a Creative Expression Workshop and an Expressive Arts Seminar. 

1. Creative Expression Workshop 

The faculty and students will be members in a learning-celebrating com- 
munity. The process of building such a community will be initiated with a 
five-day founding event at a non-Cluster site during January 6-10, 1975. 
The founding event will include a Creative Expression Workshop, which will 
begin with an intensive exposure to some basic human experience (e.g.. joy, 
pain, loneliness, hope, grief, etc.). Members of the community will then ex- 
press this experience in significant art forms and experience how other 
artists have expressed it. 

2. Expressive Arts Seminar 

During subsequent weeks the community will meet weekly on Friday morning 
in an Expressive Arts Seminar in which members will share and possess 
each other's "mini-celebrations" and the work of representative artists. 
In this seminar members will work with various forms of expressive art in 
accord with their ability, e.g., drama, dance, music, painting, sculpture, 
song, celebrative preaching, photography, oral interpretation, creative writ- 
ing, communications media, and staging environment. 

B. Basic Theory of Celebration 

Members of the community will meet weekly on Friday afternoon to lay solid 
theoretical foundations for celebration. Other resource persons will be utilized 
periodically. Areas of study include the phenomenology of celebration, symbol- 
ism and celebration, analysis of classic/contemporary examples of celebration, 
and structure and design of celebration. 

C. Clinical Experience 

Each student will be involved with a group outside the Cluster schools for the 
purpose of: 

16 



I 



1. Witnessing the process by which lived moments come to peak expression in 
celebration in the group (first month), and 

2. Developing-teaching them to move further in celebration experience and 
life-style (last two months). 

D. Reflection and Evaluation 

The community will meet weekly on Monday afternoon and evening to engage in 
reflection and evaluation of their experiences and further development of their 
abilities as instigators of celebration. 

A project-report indicating integration of celebration theory and skills, as well 
as members' development as artists-interpreters-instigators of religious celebra- 
tion within the community and within the non-Cluster groups with which they 
have worked will be assessed through self-evaluation, peer evaluation, and 
supervisory evaluation at the end of the Unit. 

IV. Admission 

Open to students who have completed two or more years of theological education and 
who have obtained the approval of the school in which they are matriculated. 
Open also to students (1) who have completed one year of theological education; 
(2) who have some of the following experiences and education (at least minimal 
ability-experience in an area of expressive arts, two or more courses in the general 
field of celebration, and adequate experience in actual situations of celebration); 
and (3) who have also obtained the approval both of the school in which they are 
matriculated and of the Celebration teaching team. 

All students who have obtained appropriate approval for admission should register 
for the Unit during the registration period which will be held at each school during 
the week of May 20-24. 1974. 



CELEBRATION ELECTIVE 

ART OF CHRISTIAN CELEBRATION 
CCTS 441 

A study of the nature of ritual and the laws of ritual development. Analysis of the 
constitutive elements of rite (sign and symbol, language, gesture, music, dance) and their 
relationship to the ministerial role in celebration. A consideration of certain problems and 
developments in liturgical experimentation. 



Spring, 1975 

3 QH Credit 

TTh, 12:00-1:15 p.m. 

CTU 



Basil Johnson, O.F.M. 

Instructor in Liturgies 
Catholic Theological Union 



17 



CCTS 460 CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION: INTENSIVE UNIT I 



Spring Quarter, 1975 

9QH Credit 

Monday. 9:00-4:00 p.m. 

Friday. 9:00-4:00 p.m. 

Enrollment limited to 20 

Registration Deadline: May 21-25. 1973 



John Boberg, S.V.D. 

Assistant Professor of Mission 
Theology 

Catholic Theological Union 
Helmut H. Loiskandl, S.V.D. 

Visiting Professor of Cultural 
Anthropology 

Catholic Theological Union 
James A . Scherer 

Professor of Missions 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
Dennis Geaney, O.S.A. 

Director of Field Education and 
Associate Professor of Ministry 

Catholic Theological Union 



I. Nature of the Unit 

Intensive Unit I is a total-environment experience for students who wish to acquire 
beginning levels of competence in the effective communication of the Gospel in cul- 
tures and subcultures other than their own. 

The Unit consists of one intensive quarter of involvement for which students will 
receive 9QH (or 3 units) credit. With the approval of the respective institutions in 
which they are matriculated, students who are involved in the Unit may also enroll 
in one additional course which does not conflict with the regularly-scheduled meet- 
ings of the Unit. 

II. Aims of the Unit 

The general aims of Intensive Unit I include the following: 

A. to assist students to become increasingly sensitive to cultural diversities; 

B. to assist students to develop methods for the analysis of culture and communica- 
tion; 

C. to assist students to deal constructively with the theological issues implicit in 
cross-cultural communication; and 

D. to assist students to acquire a beginning competence in cross-cultural communi- 
cation. 

III. Structure of the Unit 

There are three principal components in Intensive Unit I: theoretical presentations, 
field placements, and an integrative seminar. The ministerial preparation of students 
will be integrated in terms of these components through the use of a variety of re- 
source persons, agencies, and teaching methodologies (e.g., representatives of other 
cultures, experienced cross-cultural workers, the Chicago Center for Black Religious 
Studies, lectures, reading, discussion, films, special interest groups, and individual 
guidance from staff). 



18 



A. Theoretical Presentations 

The theoretical presentations will focus on such matters as understanding the 
ways in which cultural factors influence experiencing and symbol ization, thereby 
influencing the ways in which communication is given and received; understand- 
ing the nature of any culture through a representative examination of selected 
contrasting cultures and sub-cultures in the light of cultural anthropological 
perspectives; understanding the theological issues involved in the cultural con- 
ditioning of all experience and symbol ization; understanding the nature of the 
communication process from theological, psychological and sociological per- 
spectives; and understanding what it means theologically to communicate the 
meaning of the Christian faith. 

Such understandings will be addressed through the following topics: 

1. World Interdependencies: the Unity of Man (two weeks) 

2. Relativity and the Limitations of Cultures: One's Own and Others (three 
weeks) 

3. Christianity in the World: Varied Expressions— Present and Historical (two 
weeks) 

4. Communication across Cultures (two weeks) 

B. Field Placements 

The field placements involve participation in and study of a culture or sub-culture 
other than one's own in order to develop a beginning competence in cross-cul- 
tural communication. Students may be placed, for example, in rural, black, or 
Spanish-American cultural settings; non-Western or Latin American settings; and 
in youth culture settings. 

C. The Integrative Seminar 

In the integrative seminar students will be assisted to reflect upon and relate 
theoretical data and field experience in order to develop increased cultural sensi- 
tivity, increased ability to engage in cultural-theological analysis, especially 
of the settings in which they are ministering, and increased ability to communi- 
cate the Christian faith across cultural boundaries. 

IV. Admission to the Unit 

Open to students who have completed one or more years of theological education 
and who have obtained the approval of the school in which they are matriculated. 
All students who have obtained appropriate approval for admission should register 
for the Unit during the registration period which will be held at each school during 
the week of May 20-24, 1974. 



19 



CLUSTER AREA OF 
COOPERATIVE INSTRUCTION 

In addition to the previously-described Areas of Concentration, the Cluster also of- 
fers a less intensive program of theological instruction which draws in an integrative 
manner upon the resources of its member schools and the metropolitan Chicago area. This 
is an Area of Cooperative Instruction in Interpretation, through which various Elective 
Units will be offered. 

The Cluster Area of Cooperative Instruction is based upon the same curricular model, 
organizing principle, and defining educational and structural characteristics as the 
Cluster Areas of Concentration. Interpretation, the broad area of functional competence 
with which it deals, is complementary and parallel to the areas of functional competence 
represented by Personal Transformation, Social Transformation, Celebration and Cross- 
Cultural Communication. The Area of Cooperative Instruction is differentiated from the 
Areas of Concentration, however, by the fact that inclusion of the more clinically-ori- 
ented "interfaces" (described on p. 9 ) is an Optional, rather than essential, feature. 
I. Nature of the Units 

The Elective Units are designed for students who wish to develop an individualized 
focus of competence both in interpreting and in enabling others to interpret teachings 
and values of the Judeo-Christian tradition in their historical context and relating 
them to contemporary culture. Among the aspects of the Judeo-Christian tradition and 
the contemporary world which the concentration is designed to assist students to 
interpret are the following: biblical narratives; creedal affirmations; doctrinal develop- 
ments and formulations; ritual and institutional practices and patterns and historic 
periods and persons in the life of the church; contemporary events, trends and figures 
of social, economic, political and cultural significance; and interpersonal and intra- 
psychic experiences of individuals at various stages in the life cycle. 
Each Unit consists of a team-taught 3QH course which incorporates a significant, but 
variable, number of the interfaces which characterize the Cluster Areas of Concentra- 
tion. 

II. Aims of the Units 

The general aims of the Units include the following: 

A. to assist students to develop a growing understanding and appreciation of selected 
aspects of the Judeo-Christian tradition in their historical context, the contempor- 
ary world, and their antecedent and current interrelatedness; 

B. to assist students to develop an understanding of the nature and dimensions of the 
hermeneutical task in the light of relevant philosophical, theological, scientific, 
and artistic perspectives; 

C. to assist students to acquire appropriate levels of competence in employing sound 
hermeneutical principles and methods in interpreting to and with others selected 
aspects to the Judeo-Christian tradition, the modern world, and their relationships; 
and 

D. to assist students to acquire appropriate levels of competence in assisting others 
to interpret such realities. 

III. Structure of the Units 

There are four principal components in terms of which the Elective Units are orga- 
nized: the Seminar on Biblical Interpretation, the Seminar on History and Doctrine, the 
Seminar on Ethics and the Modern World, and the Seminar on Theology and Contempo- 
rary Thought. Various individual courses are offered under the general rubric of the 
respective seminars. 

IV. Admission 

Admission is open to students through the regular cross-registration procedures which 
are operative among the Cluster schools. 

20 



MAJOR ETHICAL ISSUES IN GLOBAL SOCIETY: RELIGIOUS AND MINISTERIALPERSPECTIVES 



COTS 487 

This seminar will focus on four major social issues that confront people throughout 
the contemporary world: the population problem and its concomitant aspect of world hun- 
ger, the impact of technology, the future of urbanization, and the need to preserve our en- 
vironment. For each issue basic data will be provided through readings and outside speak- 
ers which will serve as a way of getting at the basic concern of the seminar: what theo- 
logical perspectives can prove useful in securing a hold on these questions and what 
responses are demanded from committed Christians and their church institutions. Members 
of the Cluster Ethics and Society Field, together with outside speakers, will contribute to 
individual sessions of the course. Seminar readings will include Victor Ferkiss, Hans 
Jonas, Nicholas Crotty, Joseph Sittler, the Club of Rome Report and several United Nations 
publications. 



Winter, 1975 

3 QH Credit 

Thursday, 9:30-12:00 Noon 

Initial Session at CTU 



John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. 

Assistant Professor of Ethics 
Catholic Theological Union 

Cluster Ethics and Society Faculty 



OLD TESTAMENT THEMES 

CCTS 488 

Exercises in theological reflection on significant components of Hebrew tradition, 
with a view toward their relevance to the faith of the New Testament. Requirements to be 
determined. 



I 



Spring, 1975 
3 QH Credit 
Tuesday 10:30-11:45 
Thursday 10:30-11:45 
LSTC 



Joseph J. DeVault, S.J. 

Associate Professor of Biblical Theology 
Jesuit School of Theology at Chicago 

Richard R. Syre 

Professor of Old Testament 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 



21 



MINISTRY FOR WORLD PEACE: ISSUES AND PERSPECTIVES 



CCTS 489 

What can the churches contribute to world peace? What understandings of world peace 
might guide religious thought and action toward a world without war? What theological and 
political standards are involved in setting limits and determining priorities for peace act- 
ivities? How can the concern for world peace become a regular part of ministry at every 
level of church life? 

Eight Chicago-area seminary faculty including the instructors of this course are meet- 
ing regularly as the curriculum development task force of the World Without War Council- 
Midwest to design an experimental course addressing these questions. While any course 
description at this point is tentative, this course is expected to treat such topics as: the 
global political conditions for peace; the means and limits of citizen action for peace in 
the United States, with special emphasis on the role of the churches; and the theological 
bases for, and meanings of, the issues of global politics and citizen action. A detailed 
prospectus will be available during the Winter Quarter. 



Spring, 1975 Dale W. Brown 

3 QH Credit Professor of Christian Theology 

Thursday 3:30-6:00 p.m. Bethany Theological Seminary 

Initial Session at Lowell W. Live zey 

Meadvi lie/Lombard Executive Director 

World Without War Council—Midwest 
John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. 

Assistant Professor of Ethics 
Catholic Theological Union 
Neil H. Shadle 

Assistant Professor of Church in Society 
Meadvi Me/Lombard Theological School 



22 



CLUSTER DAY COURSE OFFERINGS 

A continuing concern of the Cluster is to enrich the teaching-learning experiences of 
students and faculty from each of its member institutions. The Cluster therefore seeks to 
enable students to have increased access to outstanding teachers and courses and to 
groups of students which they would otherwise be unlikely to encounter. The Cluster 
enables faculty members to participate in rewarding teaching relationships with col leagues 
from other disciplines and traditions. 

One major obstacle to the fuller realization of such aims is the geographical distance 
between the urban and suburban schools which comprise the Cluster. A special curricu- 
lar structure, known as "Cluster Day," has been created to reduce this barrier to more 
effective and productive cooperation. 

During each quarter on Thursday several outstanding electives which are represent- 
ative of the various desciplines and heritages in the Cluster will be offered at locations 
which represent an equitable distribution of travel time among the participating students. 
Each course has been scheduled to meet only once a week and to avoid rush-hour traffic. 
The first session of each course will be held on the campus of the designated instructor. 
Thereafter the number of students enrolled from the respective seminaries will be the bas- 
is upon which each class will work out an equitable determination regarding the location 
and number of future weekly sessions. Such a principle of operation permits the schedul- 
ing of each Cluster Day course to be highly responsive to the level of interest and initia- 
tive of students from the respective schools. 

Enrollment in all Cluster Day courses is open to students through the regular cross- 
registration procedures which are operative among the Cluster schools. Particulars regard- 
ing Cluster Day course offerings, including the inclusive meeting dates at the respective 
campuses, are provided on the following pages. 

DEVILS, DEMONS. AND DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY 

TEC 467 

An experiential, historical, sociological, psychological, and theological approach. To 
be guided by the interests of the students. In particular, we will try to come into contact 
with our own devils. 



Fall, 1974 
3 QH Credit 

Thursday, 1 :00-4:00 p.m. 
Initial Session at CTS 



Arthur L. Foster 

Professor of Theology and Personality 
Chicago Theological Seminary 



MASS COMMUNICATION, SOCIETY AND CHURCH 

C-473 

An investigation of the implications and utilization of the new media for Christian ed- 
ucation, worship and mission. Areas for exploration include reflecting on the new ques- 
tions raised by the communications explosion, such as McLuhanism; examining the soc- 
iological and communication impact and nature of the various media as communication 
vehicles; researching how mass media effect perception, value formation, human under- 
standing and community; studying advertising as a vital force in motivation, creativity and 
contemporary awareness; evaluating the relation of mass media and society, theories of 
mass communication, religious broadcasting approaches and strategies, media regulations 
and morality. Course approaches include readings, discussion, productions, and field trips. 



Fall, 1974 

3 QH Credit 

Thursday, 3:30-6:00 p.m. 

Initial Session at Bethany 



LeRoy E. Kennel 

Associate Professor of Communications 
Bethany Theological Seminary 



23 



THE BOOK OF HOSEA 

BHT 545 

An exegetical study of the Book of Hosea, attempting to establish the historical and 
religious setting of the book, the form and structure of the text, the personality and theo- 
logy of the author, and the way in which he related to God and his people. Requirements: 
read regularly at least two commentaries for class, write an exegetical paper and pass a 
final exam. 



Fall, 1974 
3 QH Credit 

Thursday, 3:30-6:00 p.m. 
Initial Session at NBTS 



Reidar B. Bjornard 

Professor of Old Testament Interpretation 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 



MAJOR ETHICAL ISSUES IN GLOBAL SOCIETY 
RELIGIOUS AND MINISTERIAL PERSPECTIVES 

CCTS 487 

This seminar will focus on four major social issues that confront people throughout 
the contemporary world: the population problem and its concomitant aspect of world hunger; 
the impact of technology, the future of urbanization, and the need to preserve our environ- 
ment. For each issue basic data will be provided through readings and outside speakers 
which will serve as a way of getting at the basic concern of the seminar: what theological 
perspectives can prove useful in securing a hold on these questions and what responses 
are demanded from committed Christians, and their church institutions. Members of the 
Cluster Ethics and Society Field, together with outside speakers, will contribute to indiv- 
idual sessions of the course. Seminar readings will include Victor Ferkiss, Hans Jonas, 
Nicholas Crotty, Joseph Sittler, the Club of Rome Report and several United Nations pub- 
lications. 



Winter, 1975 

3 QH Credit 

Thursday, 9:30-12:00 Noon 

Initial Session at CTU 



John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. 

Assistant Professor of Ethics 
Catholic Theological Union 

Cluster Ethics and Society Faculty 



CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN MEDICINE AND LAW 
IN CHRISTIAN PERSPECTIVE 

CHT 560 

The course will examine a number of contemporary issues in the fields of Medicine 
and Law, particularly focusing on ethical issues such as Abortion, Cloning, Genetic En- 
gineering, Victimless Crimes, etc. Included will be an examination of the current state of 
the art regarding various procedures, the medical-legal professional perspectives which 
might help inform the decision making process. 



Winter, 1975 
3 QH Credit 

Thursday, 3:30-6:00 p.m. 
Initial Session at NBTS 



L ynn R. Buzzard 

Assistant Professor of Ministry 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 



24 



THE HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE BLACK CHURCH 
IN THE UNITED STATES 

CHI 520 

A survey study of the institutional Black Church from the emergence of African Chris- 
tianity by means of historical-critical perspective on past and current significant Chris- 
tian expressions and impacts as reflected in the religious, political, social, and economic 
involvements in America, Lectures, student projects, audio-visual presentations and field 
trips will focus upon these involvements in an attempt to discover the authentic historical 
genius of the Black Church. 

Winter. 1975 Jajnes C. May 

3 QH Credit Instructor in Black Studies and Urban Church 

Thursday. 7:00-9:30 p.m. Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Initial Session at NBTS 

MINISTRY FOR WORLD PEACE: ISSUES AND PERSPECTIVES 

CCTS 489 

What can the churches contribute to world peace? What understandings of world peace 
might guide religious thought and action toward a world without war? What theological and 
political standards are involved in setting limits and determining priorities for peace act- 
ivities? How can the concern for world peace become a regular part of ministry at every 
level of church life? 

Eight Chicago-area seminary faculty including the instructors of this course are meet- 
ing regularly as the curriculum development task force of the World Without War Council- 
Midwest to design an experimental course addressing these questions. While any course 
description at this point is tentative, this course is expected to treat such topics as: ithe 
global political conditions for peace; the means and limits of citizen action for peace in 
the United States, with special emphasis on the role of the churches; and the theological 
bases for, and meaning of, the issues of global politics and citizen action. A detailed 
prospectus will be available during the winter quarter. 

Spring, 1975 Dale W. Brown 

3 QH Credit Professor of Christian Theology 

Thursday, 3:30-6:00 p.m. Bethany Theological Seminary 

Initial Session at M/L Lowell W. Livezey 

Executive Director 
World Without War Council -Midwest 
John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. 

Assistant Professor of Ethics 
Catholic Theological Union 
Neil H. Shad I e 

Assistant Professor of Church in Society 
Meadvi lie/Lombard Theological School 



25 



WOMEN IN MINISTRY: THEOLOGICAL AND POLITICAL ISSUES 

DIVN 491 

This course will attempt to sort out the problems and focus on the issues relating to 
women in ministry. It will name the contemporary sociological and political issues and 
deal with them from a theological perspective which will include biblical, historical and 
systematic reflection. Both men and women are encouraged and invited to enroll in the 
course. Resource persons will include men and women from various theological disci- 
plines and others who are currently engaged in various types of ministry. Requirements 
will be negotiated at the beginning of the course. 

Spring, 1975 « Marjorie Tuite, O.P. 
3 QH Credit Coordinator, Ministerial Program 

Thursday, 6:30-9:00 p.m. Jesuit School of Theology at Chicago 

Initial Session at JSTC 



26 



COURSE LISTINGS 







1. BIBLICAL STUDIES 






A. Old Testament 


Bbl 


341 


General Introduction 


BLL 


315 


The Bible: Its Formation and 



Interpretation—Section 1 



Section 2 



CTU 


BLL 


300 


Old Testament Introduction 
Section 1 
Section 2 


NBTS 


BHT 


521 


Old Testament Introduction: 
History and Archaeology 


NBTS 


BHT 


522 


Old Testament Introduction II 


DeAn 


Bbl 


442 


Old Testament Institutions 1 


DeAn 


Bbl 


443 


Old Testament Institutions II 


LSTC 


OT 


311 


Old Testament Studies 1 


LSTC 


OT 


312 


Old Testament Studies II 


LSTC 


OT 


313 


Old Testament Studies III 


NBTS 


BHT 


523 


Old Testament Theology 


CCTS 


CCTS 


488 


Old Testament Themes 


JSTC 


DIVN 


300 


Old Testament 1: Second 
Millenium B.C. 


JSTC 


DIVN 


302 


Old Testament II: First 
Millenium B.C. 


CTS 


CH 


301 


Faith and the People of Israel: 1 


CTU 


BLL 


400 


Historical Exegetical Study of 
the Pentateuch 


LSTC 


OT 


439 


Genesis, 1-11 


LSTC 


OT 


442 


Exodus 


CTU 


BLL 


425 


Old Testament Wisdom Literature 
Section 1 
Section 2 


LSTC 


OT 


420 


Job 


JSTC 


DIVN 


400 


Psalms 


CTU 


BLL 


410 


Pre-Exilic Prophecy 
Section 1 



Section 2 

CTS CH 302 People and Faith of Israel II 

(Reading in Prophets) 
NBTS BHT 541 Isaiah 1-39 

NBTS BHT 542 Isaiah 40-66 

LSTC OT 414 Jeremiah 



f/sc/7er. Fall, MWF, 10:10 

Senior/Stuhlmueller. Spring, 

MWF, 10-10:50 
Senior/Stuhlmueller, Spring, 

MWF, 11-11:50 

Spilly, Fall, MWF, 2-2:50 
Fox, Fall. MWF, 2-2:50 

Bjornard, Fall, MWF, 10:30 
Bjornard, Winter, MWF, 10:30 
Fischer, Winter. MWF, 10:10 
Fischer, Spring, MWF, 8:00 
Fuerst, Fall, TBA 
Syre, Winter. TBA 
Michel, Spring, TBA 
Bjornard, Spring, MWF, 10:30 
DeVault/Syre, Spring, TTh, 
10:30-11:45 

DeVault, Fall. MW. 2-3:15 
DeVault, Winter. MW, 2-3:15 

Lacocque, Winter. MWF, 9:00 



Fox. Fall, MWF, 10-10:50 
Michel, Spring, TBA 
Syre, Fall, TBA 



Fox, Spring, MWF, 9-9:50 
Fox, Spring, MWF. 11-11:50 
Michel, Fall. TBA 
DeVault, Spring, MW, 2-3:15 



Stuhlmueller, Winter, MWF, 

10-10:50 
Stuhlmueller, Winter, W, 

7-9:30 pm 

Lacocque. Fall, MWF, 9:00 
Bjornard, Winter, MWF, 2:10 
Bjornard, Spring. MWF, 2:10 
Syre, Winter, TBA 



■^Cluster Day Course or Area of Cooperative Instruction, cf. pp. 21-26 for course description. 



27 



+ NBTS BHT 545 Hosea 

CTS CH 412 The Second Temple Period 

(Minor Prophets) 

CTU BLL 515 Anthropology of the Old Test- 

ament 
CTS CH 401 The Son of Man in the OT & 

Intertestamental Literature 
CTS CH 425 Worship in Ancient Israel: Temple 

& Synagogue 
JSTC DIVN 509 The Experience of God in the 

Bible and in the Hindu 

Scriptures 
LSTC OT 525 Megi Moth-Words from the Canon's 

Edge 
LSTC OT 320 Teaching Old Testament in the 

Parish 

B. New Testament 

Intro, to the New Testament 
New Testament Theology 
New Testament Introduction 

Section 1 

Section 2 
Apostolic Literature I 
Apostolic Literature II 
New Testament Introduction 
New Testament Theology 
New Testament Theology 

Gospel Tradition 
The Synoptic Gospels 
Gospel According to Matthew 



BTS 


A-330 




BTS 


A-332 




CTU 


BLL 


305 


DeAn 


Bbl 


413 


DeAn 


Bbl 


414 


NBTS 


BHT 


560 


NBTS 


BHT 


561 


LSTC 


NT 


424 


LSTC 


NT 


320 


CTS 


CH 


321 


CTU 


BLL 


430 



JSTC 



JSTC 



DIVN 409 New Testament II: Mark-Matthew 

DIVN 509 Graduate Seminar: The Composi- 
tion of the First Gospel 



Bjornard. Fall, Th, 3:30-6:00 
Lacocque. Spring, MWF, 9:00 
Fox, Winter, TTh. 12-1:15 
Lacocque, Spring, TTh, 1-2:30 
Lacocque, Fall. TTh, 1-2:30 

Curiyicad, Fall, MW, 3:30-4:45 
Fuerst, Winter, TBA 
Syre, Spring, TBA 



Snyder, Spring, MWF, 10:30 
Snyder, Fall, MWF, 10:30 

Senior, Winter. MWF, 10-10:50 
Karris, Winter, MWF, 10-10:50 
Fischer, Winter, MWF, 9:05 
Fischer, Spring, MWF. 10:10 
Brauch, Spring. MWF, 11:30 
/l/leye/Brauch, Fall, MWF, 11:30 
Linss, Winter, TBA 

Vbd'bus, Winter, TBA 

Scruggs, Spring. WF. 10:30-12:00 

Langerholz, Spring, MWF, 12:00- 

12:50 
Thompson, Winter, TTh, 10:30- 

11:45 



Thompson, Winter, TBA 



CTU 


BLL 


432 


Gospel According to Mark 


Senior, Fall, TTh, 9-10:15 


JSTC 


DIVN 


301 


New Testament III: Luke-Acts, 
John 


Thompson. Spring, TTh, 10:30- 
11:45 


LSTC 


NT 


427 


Exegesis of Luke 


Voobus, Fall, TBA 


CTU 


BLL 


440 


Gospel According to John 
Section 1 
Section 2 


Langerholz, Winter, MWF, 9-9:50 
Langerholz, Winter, MWF, 12- 
12:50 


CTU 


BLL 


460 


Acts of the Apostles 


Karris. Fall, W, 7-9:30 pm 


LSTC 


NT 


429 


Studies in Acts 


Vdtibus, Winter, TBA 


NBTS 


BHT 


570 


Acts 


Brauch, Winter, MW, 3:10-4:30 



+ Cluster Day Course or Area of Cooperative Instruction, cf. pp. 21-26 for course description. 



28 



JSTC 


DIVN 


413 


CTS 


CH 


423 


CTU 


BLL 


450 


JSTC 


DIVN 


307 


LSTC 


NT 


330 


NBTS 


BHT 


566 


NBTS 


BHT 


575 


BTS 


A-531 




CTS 


CH 


525 


CTU 


BLL 


455 


NBTS 


BHT 


558 


CTS 


CH 


522 



CTU 


BLL 


535 


LSTC 


NT 


420 


CTU 


BLL 


490 


CTU 


BLL 


570 


LSTC 


NT 


426 


LSTC 


NT 


417 


JSTC 


DIVN 


409 


CTU 


BLL 


573 


LSTC 


NT 


540 



The Christian Apostolic Letter 
Theology of Paul as Cultural 
Critique 

Pauline Theology 

New Testament I: Pauline Writings 

Pauline Tradition 

Problems in Pauline Theology 

Romans 

Romans 

Seminar: Paul's Letter to the 

Romans (Greek prerequisite) 

Pauline Exegesis: Corinthians 
Exegesis of Johannine Epistles 
NT Seminary II: Early Church 

Views of Jesus' Death and 

Resurrection 

Resurrection Texts in the Gospels 

and St. Paul 
Passion and Resurrection 

Narratives 
Biblical Foundations of Mission 

Phenomenon of Early Catholics 

in the New Testament 
Church in the New Testament 
Sacraments in the New Testament 
The Eucharist in the New 

Testament 
Baptism, Creed, and Christology 

in the New Testament 
Sin and Forgiveness in the New 

Testament 



La Verd /ere. Spring. TBA 

Scroggs, Winter, WF, 10:30- 

12:00 
Spilly. Fall, MWF. 10-10:50 
Thompson, Fall, TTh, 10:30- 

11:45 
Linss, Fall. TBA 
Brauch. Winter, MWF, 11:30 
Brauch, Fall, MWF, 8:30 
Wieand, Fall, TBA 

Scroggs. Spring, TTh, 10:30- 

12:00 
Karris, Spring, MWF, 11-11:50 
Brauch. Spring, MW, 3:10-4:30 



Scroggs. Winter, TTh, 10:30- 
12:00 

Langerholz, Fall, MWF, 12-1 2:50 

Vdtibus, Fall, TBA 
Senior/Stuhlmueller, Winter, 
TTh, 9-10:15 

Karris. Spring. W, 7-9:30 pm 
Vbbbus, Fall, TBA 
Vdbbus. Spring, TBA 

LaVerdiere, Winter. TBA 

Karris, Winter. Tu. 6:30-9:00 pm 

Linss, Spring. TBA 



C. Biblical Languages 



September Pre-Session at LSTC (Tuition: $50.00): 



I 





NT 




OT 


CTU 


BLL 


DeAn 




LSTC 


OT 


LSTC 


OT 


*NBTS/ 




BTS 


A-311a 


*NBTS/ 




BTS 


A-31 1 b 



200 New Testament Greek 

300 Elementary Hebrew 

325 Introductory Hebrew 

Biblical Hebrew (Tutorial) 

301 Hebrew II 

401 Hebrew Readings and Grammar 

Hebrew Language I 
Hebrew Language II 



Linss, September 4-27 
l\/lichel, September 4-27 

Fox, Winter. TBA 
Rousseau, TBA 
H/lichei. Fall. TBA 
l\/lichel. Winter, TBA 

TBA, Fall, MWF, 1:10 

TBA, Winter, MWF, 1:10 



k 



* Indicates jointly sponsored courses. 



29 



^NBTS/ 






BTS 


A-311C 


Hebrew Language III 


CTU 


BLL 320 


Biblical Greek 


DeAn 




Biblical Greek (Tutorial) 


NBTS/ 


BHT 551 




BTS 


A-316a 


Elements of New Testament 
Greek 1 


NBTS/ 


BHT 552 




BTS 


A-316b 


Elements of New Testament 
Greek II 


NBTS/ 


BHT 553 




BTS 


A-316C 


Elements of New Testament 
Greek III 



TBA. Spring. MWF, 1:10 

Karris, Fall. MTh, 7:30-8:45 pm 
Rousseau, TBA 



Snyder, Fall. MWF.1:10 



Snyder. Winter, MWF, 1:10 



Snyder, Spring. MWF, 1:10 



D. Jewish Studies 



CTS 



CH 



425 



CTS 


CH 


493 


CTU 


BLL 


521 


CTU 


BLL 


522 


CTU 


BLL 


524 


CTU 


BLL 


526 



Worship in Ancient Israel: 
Temple and Synagogue 
An Inquiry into Judaic Issues 
Liturgy of the Synagogue II 
Liturgy of the Synagogue III 
Readings in Rabbinic Literature 
Rabbinic Judaism and the Early 
Church 



Lacocque, Fall, TTh, 1-2:30 
Lacocque, Winter, TTh, 1-2:30 
Per e /muter. Fall, TBA 
Per el muter. Spring, TBA 
Per el muter. Spring, TBA 

Per el muter. Fall, TBA 



II. THEOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY 
A. Doctrine 



DeAn 


ThI 


300 


Orientation: Nature of Theology 


Persich, Fall. WF. 8:00 


CTU 


HDS 


320 


Phenomenology of Religion 


Vanasse, Fall, MWF, 10:00 


CTU 


HDS 


325 


Introduction to Theology 


Schreiter, Fall, MWF, 11-11:50 


CTU 


HDS 


397 


Area Studies 


Staff, Spring, MWF. 12-12:50 


LSTC 


CT 


321 


Theological Methodology 


Sittler, Fall, TBA 


NBTS 


CHT 


551 


Philosophy of Religion 


Young, Fall. MWF. 11:30 


LSTC 


CT 


521 


Advanced Seminar in Theologi- 
cal Methodology 


Hefner, Spring. TBA 


CTS 


TEC 


304 


Constructive Theology 1 


Jennings, Winter. MW. 2-3:30 


CTS 


TEC 


305 


Constructive Theology II 


LeFevre, Winter. MW. 2-3:30 


JSTC 


DIVN 


351 


Fundamental Theology 1 


Doyle/Sears, Fall. MTh, 10:00 
F, TBA 


JSTC 


DIVN 


352 


Fundamental Theology II 


Doyle/Sears, Winter. MTh. 
10:00. F. TBA 


JSTC 


DIVN 


353 


Fundamental Theology III 


Doyle/Sears, Spring. MTh. 
10:00. F,TBA 


LSTC 


CT 


322 


Christian Theology 1 


Hefner, Winter. TBA 


LSTC 


CT 


323 


Christian Theology II 


Hefner, Spring. TBA 


NBTS 


CHT 


571 


Systematic Theology 1 


Young, Fall. TTh. 8-9:20 


NBTS 


CHT 


572 


Systematic Theology II 


Devasahayam, Winter. TTh. 
8-9:20 



Limited enrollment, previous permission of instructor required. 



30 



NBTS 



CHT 573 Systematic Theology III 



Devasahayam, Spring, TTh, 
8-9:20 



BTS 


B-359 




Theology and Literary Arts 


LSTC 


CT 


420 


The Church and the Arts 


M/L 


TS 


322 


Contemporary Options in 
Liberal Theology 


CTS 


TEC 


411 


Theological Anthropology 



CTS 



TEC 500 Interpretation 



Groff. Spring. M, 2:10-4:40 
Sittler, Winter, TBA 

Engel, Spring, TBA 
LeFevre, Winter, TTh, 10:30- 

12:00 
LeFevre, Fall, W. 2-5:00 



CTU HDS 330 Problem of God & Contem- 

porary Society 
CTU HDS 432 Problem of God and Other 

Religions 
Theology of the Trinity 
The Problem of God 
The Triune God 
The Holy Spirit in the 

Christian Community 
The Theology of Pentacostalism 
The Major Indian Religions in 
Christian Perspective 

CTU HDS 546 The Unknown & Known Christ 

of Hinduism 



CTU 


HDS 


540 


DeAn 


ThI 


421 


JSTC 


DIVN 


453 


JSTC 


DIVN 


458 


JSTC 


DIVN 


583 


NBTS 


CHT 


590 



Knitter, Winter, MWF, 11-11:50 

Knitter, Fall. MW, 3:30-4:45 
Hayes, Spring, TTh. 12-1:15 
Persic fi. Fall, MWF, 10:10 
Fortman, Winter. Th. 1:30-3:15 

Burns, Spring. WF, 2-3:15 
Sears, Winter. MW, 3:30-4:45 

Devasahayam, Winter. Th, 
1-3:30 

Knitter, Spring. MW. 3:30-4:45 



BTS 
CTS 
CTU 

JSTC 
JSTC 
JSTC 

CTU 



B-550 

TEC 406 

HDS 440 

DIVN 460 

DIVN 552 

DIVN 425 

HDS 435 



CTU 



The Language of Christology 
Christology 
Christology - Section 1 
Section 2 
Christ and Culture 
Contemporary Christologies 
Redemption in the Western 

Tradition 
Origins and Eschatology - 

Section 1 

Section 2 
Creation/Eschatology 
Life After Death 
Eschatology 

Theology of the Church 
Theology of the Church 
Missionary Dynamics of the 

Church 
Church and History 

Myths, Signs, Symbols, 

Sacraments 
Theology of the Sacraments 
The Movement of Sacramental 
Theology, 1955-75 
HDS 455 Sacraments of Initiation 



DeAn 


ThI 


424 


JSTC 


DIVN 


483 


CTS 


TEC 


407 


CTU 


HDS 


345 


DeAn 


ThI 


403 


CTU 


HDS 


446 


CTU 


HDS 


547 


CTU 


HDS 


453 


DeAn 


ThI 


461 


JSTC 


DIVN 


416 



Groff, Fall, MTh. 8-9:20 
Jennings, Spring. TTh, 1-2:30 
Knitter, Fall. MWF, 12:00 
Hayes, Winter. MWF, 11:00 
Schineller, Winter, MW, 2-3:15 
Doyle, Spring, Th, 3:30-5:30 

Burns, Winter, WF, 2-3:15 

Schreiter. Winter, MWF, 9:00 
Hayes. Spring. MWF. 10:00 
Persich, Winter. MWF, 8:00 
Fortman, Fall, Th, 1:30-3:15 
Jennings, Fall, M, 2-5:00 

A finer. Spring, MWF, 9:00 
Persich. Spring. MWF. 9:05 

Knitter, Spring. TTh, 9:00 
Ahner, Fall, MW, 3:30-4:45 



Heisig, Fall, MW, 2-3:15 
Gaydos, Fall, MWF. 8:00 

Wicks, Fall. MW, 2-3:15 
Ostdie/<, Winter, MWF. 10:00 



31 



CTU 



DeAn 
CTU 



DeAn 
DeAn 



HDS 450 Theology of the Eucharist 

Section 1 

Section 2 
ThI 462 Theology of the Eucharist 

HDS 460 Sacraments of Healing & 

Vocation 



ThI 463 The Sacrament of Penance 

ThI 464 The Sacrament of Matrimony 



Ostdiek, Fall, MWF, 9:00 
Johnson, Winter. MWF, 11:00 
Rousseau, Spring, MWF, 8:00 

Johnson/ Ostdiek, Spring, 

MWF, 10:00 
Gaydos, Winter. MWF, 8:00 
Danagher, Spring, MWF, 10:10 



CTS 



TEC 424 Theologies of Liberation 



CTS 


TEC 


432 


Contemporary Process Theology 


CTS 


TEC 


412 


Communication 


JSTC 


DIVN 


557 


Hermeneutics and History 


xLSTC 


CT 


515 


Seminar in 19th Century Theology 


CTS 


CH 


470 


Contemporary Continental 
Theology 


JSTC 


DIVN 


461 


Faith, Hope and Love 



Meyners, Winter, MW, 10:30- 

12:00 
Schroeder, Fall, Th, 1:30-4:30 
Snyder, Spring, TTh, 8:30- 

10:00 
Doyle, Spring, W, 3:30-5:30 
Hefner. Fall, TBA 

Jennings, Winter, TTh, 1-2:30 
Schineller, Spring, MW, 3:30- 
4:45 



B. Theologians 



JSTC 


DIVN 


420 


JSTC 


DIVN 


554 


CTU 


HDS 


566 


CTS 


CH 


595 


JSTC 


DIVN 


489 


M/L 


TS 


437 


BTS 


B-452 




JSTC 


DIVN 


592 



LSTC 



CT 



411 



JSTC 


DIVN 


545 


JSTC 


DIVN 


455 


JSTC 


DIVN 


459 


JSTC 


DIVN 


544 


JSTC 


DIVN 


457 


JSTC 


DIVN 


456 


BTS 


B-469 





Introduction to the Thought 
of Thomas Aquinas 

The Thomistic Renewal 

Christology of St. Bonaventure 

Kierkegaard 

Heidegger and Theology 

Theology of H. N. Wieman 
Theology of Karl Barth 
Theology of Paul Tillich 

The Legacy of Dietrich 

Bonhoeffer 
Philosophy of Karl Rahner 
Rahner's Theoretical Theology 

Rahner's Applied Theology 

Philosophy of B. J. Lonergan 
Lonergan's Theology 

Lonergan's Method in Theology 

Dialogue: Jacques Ellul & 
John Howard Yoder 



Montague, Winter, TTh, 10:30- 

11:45 
n/lontague. Fall, MWF, 11:00 
Hayes, Winter, Th, 2-4:30 
LeFevre, Fall, W, 2-5:00 
Montague, Winter, MW, 3:30- 

4:45 
Godbey, Winter, TBA 
Groff. Winter, MTh, 8-9:20 
Montague, Spring, TTh, 10:30- 

11:45 

Sherman, Spring, TBA 
Wulftange, Fall, W, 3:30-5:30 
Wulftange, Winter. W, 3:30- 

5:30 
Wulftange, Spring, W, 3:30- 

5:30 
Wulftange, Fall, M, 3:30-5:30 
Wulftange. Winter, M, 3:30- 

5:30 
Wulftange. Spring, M, 3:30- 

5:30 

Brown. Winter, T, 7-9:30 pm 



32 



C. Problems 



CTU HDS 330 The Problem of God & Contem- 

porary Society 

CTU HDS 432 The Problem of God & Other 

Religions 

CTU HDS 466 Christian Attitudes Towards 

World Religions 

CTU HDS 534 American Theological Thought: 

Issues & Perspectives 

CTS TEC 424 Theologies of Liberation 

NBTS CHT 515 The Christian Life 

NBTS CHT 551 Philosophy of Rel igion 



Knitter. Winter. MWF. 11-11:50 

Knitter, Fall. MW. 3:30-4:45 

Knitter, Winter. TTh. 10:30- 
11:45 

Leiiaert, Fall. TTh. 10:30- 

11:45 
H/leyners, Winter. MW. 10:30- 

12:00 
Oiilmann, Winter, MWF. 2:10 
Young, Fall, MWF. 11:30 



JSTC 
NBTS 



DIVN 557 
CHT 515 



III. HISTORICAL STUDIES 

A. Methodology 

Hermeneutics and History 
The Christian Life 



Doyle, Spring, W, 3:30-5:30 
Oiilmann, Winter, MWF, 2:00 



CTU 


HDS 


302 


DeAn 


Hst 


407 


JSTC 


DIVN 


315 


JSTC 


DIVN 


458 


LSTC 


HT 


311 


NBTS 


CHT 


501 



B. Early Church 

The Early Expansion of 

Christianity 
History of the Church Until 

700 
Early Christianity 
The Holy Spirit in the 

Christian Community 
Ancient & Medieval Church 

History 
Early & Medieval Christianity 

C. Medieval 



Staff, Winter, MWF, 12:00 

Hartenbach, Fall, MTh, 8:00 
Burns, Fall, MWF, 10:00 

Burns, Spring, WF, 2-3:15 

Fisciier, Winter, TBA 
Oiilmann, Fall, MWF. 10:30 



CTU 


HDS 


307 


DeAn 


Hst 


409 


NBTS 


CHT 


501 


JSTC 


DIVN 


513 


JSTC 


DIVN 


420 


JSTC 


DIVN 


554 



History of the Church: 
Medieval Period 

History of the Church from 
700 to 1 500 

Early & Medieval Christianity 

Monastic Theology & Spiritual- 
ity in the 12th Century 

Introduction to the Thought of 
Thomas Aquinas 

The Thomistic Renewal 



Jegen, Spring. W. 2-4:30 

Hartenbach. Winter. MW. 9:05 
Ohimann. Fall. MWF, 10:30 

Montague, Spring, MW, 3:30- 
4:45 

Montague, Winter. TTh. 10:30- 

11:45 
Montague, Fall. MWF. 11:00 



33 



D. Reformation 



JSTC 


DIVN 


319 


The Reformation 


LSTC 


HT 


312A 


Reformation and Modern Church 
History 


LSTC 


HT 


312B 


Studies in Reformation & 
Modern Church History 


NBTS 


CHT 


502 


Reformation & Modern Chris- 
tianity 


JSTC 


DIVN 


323 


Counterreformation Theology 


LSTC 


HT 


314 


The Lutheran Heritage 


BTS 


B-456 




Luther, Calvin, Wesley 


BTS 


B-340 




Believers' Church 



BTS 



B-440 



M/L 


TS 


432 


NBTS 


CHT 


503 


M/L 


TS 


394 



The Radical Reformation 

The Radical Reformation 
Baptist History and Thought 
Theological Issues in Unitarian 
Universal ist History 

E. Modern 



Wicks, Winter. MWF, 10:00 

Fischer, Spring, TBA 

Ku/<konen, Spring, TBA 

Ohimann. Winter. MWF, 10:30 
Wicks. Spring. TTh, 9-10:15 
Scherer, Winter, TBA 
Brown, Winter, MWF, 10:30 
Durnbaugh, Fall, MWF. 3:10- 

4:00 
Durnbaugli, Winter. MW. 2:10- 

3:30 
God bey. Fall. TBA 
Ohimann, Spring. MWF. 10:30 

God bey. Fall. TBA 



DeAn 


Hst 


410 


History of the Church from 
1500 to the Present 


NBTS 


CHT 


502 


Reformation and Modern Chris- 
tianity 


LSTC 


HT 


312A 


Reformation & Modern Church 
History 


LSTC 


HT 


312B 


Studies in Reformation & Modern 
Church History 


CTU 


HDS 


312 


Christianity and the Seculari- 
zation of Europe 


BTS 


B-457 




Brethren in Theological 
Perspective 


BTS 


B-445 




The Intentional Community 


BTS 


B-459 




Studies in Spirituality: Ortho- 
doxy. Quakerism, Pietism 


LSTC 


HT 


420 


Orthodoxy & Pietism in the 
17th Century 


CTS 


CH 


592 


An Inquiry into Nihilism 


+ NBTS 


CHT 


520 


History & Development of 
the Black Church 


NBTS 


CHT 


521 


Christianity in Africa 


JSTC 


DIVN 


454 


John Henry Newman: Prophetic 
Figure of Contemporary 
Catholicism 


JSTC 


DIVN 


422 


Roman Catholicism: The Last 
100 Years 


JSTC 


DIVN 


423 


The Revolution & Pontificate 
of John XXIII 


BTS 


B-444 




Modern Cults 


JSTC 


DIVN 


416 


The Movement of Sacramental 



Theology 1955-75 



Hartenbach, Winter. WF, 10:00 

Ohimann, Winter, MWF. 10:30 

Fischer, Spring, TBA 

Kukkonen, Winter, TBA 

Joyce, Fall, MWF, 12:00 

Brown, Fall. MWF. 11:30 
Durnbaugh, Spring, T, 7-9:30 pm 

Brown, Spring, MTh, 8-9:20 

Kukkonen, Winter. TBA 
Manschreck, Fall. MW. 10:30- 
12:00 

May. Winter. Th. 7-9:30 pm 
May, Spring. Th. 1-3:30 

Ross, Winter, W. 3:30-5:30 

Ross, Winter, M, 3:30-5:30 

Ross, Spring, W. 3:30-5:30 
Durnbaugh, Fall, T. 7-9:30 pm 

Wicks, Fall, MW, 2-3:15 



34 



F. American 



DeAn 


Hst 


413 


History of the Church in 
America 


CTS 


CH 


480 


American Religious Experience, 
to the Civil War 


JSTC 


DIVN 


424 


Religion in America: The 
General Experience 


JSTC 


DIVN 


421 


Religion in America: The 

Roman Catholic Experience 


LSTC 


HT 


31 3A 


American Church History 


LSTC 


HT 


3138 


American Church History 


NBTS 


CHT 


510 


American Christianity 


CTU 


HDS 


421 


The Church and the American 
City 


LSTC 


HT 


431 


Theological Conflict in Ameri- 
can Lutheranism 


NBTS 


CHT 


517 


From Sacred to Secular 



Hartenbach, Spring, TBA 

Manschreck, Fall. TTh. 10:30- 
12:00 

Hennesey, Fall. TBA 

Hennesey, Spring, TBA 
Scherer, Fall. TBA 
Fischer, Fall, TBA 
Ohimann, Fall. MWF. 2:10 

Joyce, Winter, TTh, 12:00- 
1:15 

Arden, Fall, TBA 

Ohimann, Spring. MWF. 2:10 



I 



I 



CTS 



CTS 



CHRISTIAN ETHICS 
A. Social and Theological Ethics 



CCTS 


CCTS 


489 


Major Ethical Issues in Global 
Society 


BTS 
CTS 
CTU 
CTU 


B-351 
TEC 
HDS 
HDS 


321 
370 
375 


Christian Faith and Ethics 
Christian Ethics 
Introduction to Moral Theology 
Theological Foundations of 
Social Ethics 


DeAn 
JSTC 


ThI 
DIVN 


341 
335 


Principles of Christian 

Morality 
Moral Theology 1 


JSTC 


DIVN 


335 


Moral Theology II 


JSTC 


DIVN 


337 


Moral Theology III 


LSTC 


CT 


331 


Christian Ethics 


CTS 


TEC 


450 


The Voluntary Church and the 



Pawlikowski/Staff, Winter. Th. 

9:30-12:00 
Miller, Fall. MWF, 2:10 
Schroeder, Fall, MW. 2-3:30 
McDonald, Winter, MWF, 12:00 

Pawlikowski. Spring, MWF, 
11:00 

Persich, Winter, MWF, 9:05 
Connery/O'Callaghan, Fall. 

MWF, 11:00 
C onnery /Gallagher /O'C a I la- 

ghan. Winter, MWF, 11:00 
C onnery /Gallagher /O'C a I la- 

ghan. Spring, MWF. 11:00 
Benne, Winter, TBA 



Schroeder, Winter, Th. 1:30- 
4:30 



American Experience 

TEC 541 Sociology of Religion: Contem- 
porary Schroeder, Winter, M, 1:30- 

4:30 
442 Sociology of Religion: Historical Schroeder, Spring, W, 1:30- 

4:30 



TEC 



35 



CTS 


TEC 


441 


CTS 


TEC 


520 


JSTC 


DIVN 


441 


JSTC 


DIVN 


435 


CTU 


HDS 


471 



CTU 

CTU 
DeAn 

CTU 



+ CCTS 
CTU 

CTU 



HDS 473 



HDS 
ThI 



476 
443 



HDS 482 



DeAn 


ThI 


442 


JSTC 


DIVN 


440 


CTU 


HDS 


580 


LSTC 


CS 


414 


CTU 


HDS 


573 


+ NBTS 


CHT 


560 


xLSTC 


CS/CT 


425 


LSTC 


CS 


431 



CCTS 489 



HDS 477 



HDS 447 



Communities of Faith 
Theology & Social Ethics of 
H. R. Niebuhr 

Prudence and Situation Ethics 
Agape and the Moral Life 
Role of Experience in Moral 

Theology 
Christ and Ethics 

Culture and Christian Life 
Man in His Relations to Others 

Moral Dilemmas About 
Human Life 

The Gift of Life 
Control of Human Life 

Theology and Ethics of 
Christian Marriage 
Ethics of Sex and Family Life 

Ethical Values in Literature & 
the Arts 

Medical & Legal Issues in 
Biblical Perspective 

Black Identity & Lutheran 
Heritage 

Human Destructiveness: 
Psychological. Socio- 
logical, Theological 
Perspectives 

B. Church and Society 

Ministry for World Peace: Issues 
and Perspectives 

Theological Reflection on Eco- 
nomic & Political Issues 
of Cross-Cultural Import 

Church & Structure: Theology 
of Law 
Section 1 
Section 2 



DeAn 


Law 


315 


Church Law: Fundamental Norms 


DeAn 


Law 


416 


Church Government 


DeAn 


Law 


417 


Religious and Laity 


M/L 


TS 


395 


American Religious & Political 
Liberalism 


LSTC 


CS/CT 


425 


Black Identity & Lutheran 
Heritage 


NBTS 


CHT 


517 


From Sacred to Secular 



Meyners, Fall, M, 2-5:00 

Schroeder, Spring, M, 1:30- 

4:30 
Cannery, Spring, W, 2-4:45 
Cannery, Fall, W, 2-4:45 

MacDanald, Spring, MW, 2-3:15 
Pawlikawski, Fall, TTh, 12- 

1:15 
Bevan, Fall, MWF, 11:00 
Gaydas, Spring, MWF, 9:05 



MacDanald, Fall, TTh, 10:30- 

11:45 
Gaydas, Winter, MWF, 10:10 
Cannery, Winter. W, 2-4:45 



MacDanald, Winter, MW, 2-3:15 
Benne, Winter, TBA 



Pawlikawski, Fall, Th, 2-3:30 
Buzzard, Winter, Th, 3:30-6:00 
Benne/Hefner, Fall. TBA 

Sherman, Winter, TBA 

Staff, Spring, Th, 3:30-6:00 
Bevan, Winter. MWF. 12:00 



Banner, Fall, TTh, 10:30-11:45 
Banner, Spring, TTh, 10:30- 

11:45 
Danagher, Winter, MW, 8:00 
Danagher, Fall, WF, 8:00 
Danagher, Spring. WTh. 8:00 

Engel, Winter, TBA 

Benne/Hefner, Fall. TBA 
Oh I man n. Spring, MWF. 2:10 



36 



V. PASTORAL CARE AND MINISTRY 



BIS 


C-387 




CTU 


CMM 


330 


CTU 


CMM 


420 


DeAn 


Tpw 


310 


JSTC 


DIVN 


491 



M/L 



CTU 

xLSTC 
xLSTC 

NBTS 



CTS 



Min 



PC 
PC 



363 



M/L 


Min 


304 


NBTS 


PMC 


545 


BTS 


C-480 




BTS 


C-582 




BTS 


C-581 




CTS 


CM 


451 


CTU 


CMM 


400 


CTU 


CMM 


405 



CMM 406 



410 
420 



PMC 521 



DeAn 


ThI 


402 


DeAn 


Psy 


402 


LSTC 


PC 


430 


CTU 


CMM 


509 



TEC 467 



CTS 


CMM 


444 


CTS 


TEC 


466 


+ CTS 


TEC 


467 


CTS 


TEC 


463 


DeAn 


Psy 


404 


xLSTC 


PC 


445 



A. Pastoral Care 

The Pastor & the Congregation 
Pastoral Care in the Church 
Legal Aspects of the Sacra- 
ments 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

Women in Ministry: Theologi- 
cal and Political Issues 

Church Administration as 
Ministry 

Bearing Witness 

Ministerial Duties 



Robinson, Spring, MTh. 8-9:20 
Mallonee. Fall. MWF. 9:00 

Bonner. Winter, TTh, 10:30- 

11:45 
Piacitelli. Fall, Field 

Tuite, Spring, Th, 6:30- 

9:00 pm 
Sutherland, Fall, TBA 
Schneider, Winter, TBA 
Buzzard, Spring, MWF, 11:30 



B. Counseling and Psychology 



Introduction to Pastoral Care 

& Counseling 
Introduction to Group Counsel- 
ing & Therapy 
Seminar in Advanced Pastoral 

Counseling 
Gestalt Therapy & Religious 

Experience 
Sources of Pastoral Psychology 

Section 1 

Section 2 
Basic Types of Pastoral 

Counseling 

Section 1 

Section 2 
Practicum in Basic Types of 

Pastoral Counseling 
Pastoral Counseling 
Personality Theory & 

Psychotherapy 
Psychology & Pastoral 

Counseling 
Counseling the Christian 
Personality Development 
Group Dynamics 
Psychology & Religious 

Experience 
Ethical & Theological Issues 

in Humanistic Psychology 
Images of Man and Woman 
Dreams, Fantasy, and Religion 
Devils, Demons, and Depth 

Psychology 
Meaning of the Body 
Psychology of Religion 
Guilt and Grace in Psycho- 
logical and Theological 

Perspective 



Royer, Spring, MW, 2:10-3:30 

Royer. Winter, Th, 1:10-3:30 

Royer, Fall, MWF, 3:10-4:00 

Anderson. Fall. W, 2-5:00 

Newbold. Fall, TTh. 9-10:15 
Heisig. Spring. MW. 3:30-4:45 



Newbold. Fall. TTh. 12-1:15 
Mallonee. Winter. TTh. 9-10:15 

Mallonee. Spring. TTh. 9-10:15 
Swans on. Fall. TBA 

Swanson, Spring. TBA 

Butler. Fall. WF, 8-9:20 
Persich. Winter. TBA 
Schultz. Winter. TBA 
Swanson. Fall. TBA 

Heisig. Winter. MW. 3:30-4:45 

Meyners. Winter. TTh, 1-2:30 
Meyners, Spring. W, 7-10:00 
Foster, Winter. MW, 3:30-5:00 

Foster, Fall. TTh, 1-2:30 
Foster, Spring. W, 2-5:00 
Schultz, Fall, TBA 



Kukkonen. Winter, TBA 



37 



NBTS 


PMC 


522 


Personality and Religion 


JSTC 


DIVN 


480 


Psychology & Spiritual 
Development 1 


JSTC 


DIVN 


481 


Psychology & Spiritual 
Development II 


CTU 


CMM 


410 


Guidance & Spiritual Direction 



Butler. Winter. WF. 8-9:20 

Robb. Winter, MW, 11-12:15 

Robb, Spring, MW, 11-12:15 
Isabell, Fall. MWF, 11:00 



BTS 


C-484 




CTS 


CM 


331 


M/L 


MIN 


396 


CTS 


CM 


432 


xLSTC 


PC 


450 


NBTS 


PMC 


541 


DeAn 


ThI 


401 


CTU 


HDS 


390 


CTU 


HDS 


493 


JSTC 


DIVN 


513 


JSTC 


DIVN 


490 


JSTC 


DIVN 


594 


DeAn 


Twp 


311 


DeAn 


Twp 


312 


DeAn 


Twp 


420 


DeAn 


Twp 


504 


DeAn 


Twp 


440 


xLSTC 


PC 


400 


NBTS 


FE 


350 


NBTS 


FE 


553 


NBTS 


FE 


554 



C. Special Ministries 

Church Organizational 
Behavior 

House Church: Theory, Experi- 
ence, & Implications 

Small Groups and the Church 

Marriage and Family Counseling 
(Spouse must agree to 
participate) 
Marriage and Family Counseling 
Marriage and Family Counseling 
Counseling in Sexual Problems 

Intro, to Spiritual Theology 
Development of Christian 

Spirituality IV 
Monastic Theology & Spiritu- 
ality of the 12th Century 

Discernment of Spirits Ac- 
cording to St. Ignatius 

Foundations of the Spiritual 
Exercises of St. Ignatius 

Pastoral Care of the Dis- 
advantaged I 

Pastoral Care of the Dis- 
advantaged II 

Pastoral Care of the Mentally 
III 

Pastoral Care of the Physically 
III 

Pastoral Care through Deacon- 
ship 

Church's Role in Crisis and 

Community Health 
Case Study Conference 

Practicum: Urban Church 

Ministry 
The Suburbs and Ministry 



Wieand. Winter, TBA 

Anderson, Spring, Tu, 7-10:00 

pm 
Schneider, Spring, TBA 



Foster, Winter, Tu, 7-10:00 pm 
Swanson, Winter, TBA 
But/er, Spring, WF, 8-9:20 
Persich, Fall, MF, 9:05 

Isabell, Winter, MWF, 9:00 

Isabell, Spring. MWF. 12:00 

Montague, Spring, MW, 3:30- 
4:45 

Doyle, Fall, Th, 3:30-5:30 

Robb. Spring, F. 10-12:00 

Piacitelli, Winter, Field 

Piacitelli, Spring. Field 

Winter and Spring, Field 

Winter and Spring, Field 

Piacitelli, Fall, Winter, Spring, 
Field 

Swanson. Winter, TBA 
Buzzard, Fall, Winter. Spring. 
1:10-2:00 

May. Fall. Th, 7-9:30 pm 
Buzzard. Winter, Tu, 7-9:30 pm 



38 



CTU 



CTU 



CTU 



CTU 



CTU 



JSTC 



NBTS 



VI. WORLD MISSION AND ECUMENICS 
A. Theology of Mission 



CTU 


BLL 


490 


Biblical Foundations of 
Mission 


CTU 


HDS 


446 


Missionary Dynamics of the 
Church 


CTU 


HDS 


476 


Culture and Christian Life 


LSTC 


MT 


350 


Worldwide Christian Missions 
An Introduction 


NBTS 


CHT 


591 


Indian Christian Theology 



Senior/Stuhlmueller. Winter, 
TTh. 9-10:15 

Knitter, Spring. TTh, 9-10:15 
Bevan. Fall. MWF. 11:00 

Scherer, Fall. TBA 
Devasayaham, Spring. Th. 
3:30-6:00 



B. Ecumenics and Area Studies 



CTU 


CMM 


445 


CTU 


CMM 


530 


NBTS 


CHT 


520 


NBTS 


CHT 


521 


CTU 


HDS 


477 



CMM 541 



HDS 


432 


HDS 


466 


HDS 


453 


HDS 


546 


DIVN 


408 



CHT 590 



Missionary Catechetics 

Readings in Area Studies 

History & Development of 
the Black Church 

Christianity of Africa 

Theological Reflection on Eco- 
nomic and Political Issues 
of Cross-Cultural Import 

Contemporary Mission Prob- 
lems II 

C. Comparative Religions 

The Problem of God in Other 

Religions 
Christian Attitudes Toward 

World Religions 

Myths. Signs. Symbols, 

Sacraments 
The Unkown & Known Christ 

of Hinduism 
The Experience of God in the 

Bible & in the Hindu 

Scriptures 
The Major Indian Religions in 

Christian Perspective 



Boberg, Fall, TTh, 12-1:15 
Boberg, Winter. MW. 2-3:15 

May, Winter. Th,' 7-9:30 pm 
May, Spring. Th, 1-3:30 pm 



Bevan, Winter. MWF. 12:00 
Boberg, Winter. MW. 3:30-4:45 

Knitter. Fall. MW. 3:30-4:45 

Knitter, Winter. TTh. 10:30- 
11:45 

Heisig, Fall, MW. 2-3:15 

Knitter, Spring. MW. 3:30-4:45 

Curiyicad, Fall. MW. 3:30-4:45 

Devasayaham, Winter, Th. 1- 
3:30 



VII. WORSHIP AND PREACHING 
A. Christian Worship 



CTU HDS 515 Art of Christian Celebration 

CTU CMM 518 Practicum in Liturgy 

DeAn Ltg 332 Structures & Forms in Liturgy 



Johnson, Spring. TTh, 12-1:15 
Staff, Spring. Th. 2-4:30 
Gaydos, Fall, MTh. 9:05 



39 



DeAn 


Ltg 


341 


DeAn 


Ltg 


345 


DeAn 


Ltg 


346 


JSTC 


DIVN 


326 


JSTC 


DIVN 


328 


JSTC 


DIVN 


327 


M/L 


MIN 


361 


M/L 


MIN 


362 


NBTS 


PMC 


541 


BTS 


C-471 




BTS 


C-573 




<CTS 


CM 


301 


CTU 


CMM 


450 



CTU 


CMM 


455 


CTU 


CMM 


550 


DeAn 


Spc 


325 


DeAn 


Spc 


326 


DeAn 


Spc 


327 


M/L 


MIN 


361 


NBTS 


PMC 


542 


NBTS 


PMC 


543 


NBTS 


PMC 


551 


JSTC 


DIVN 


469 



Theology of the Liturgy 
Liturgical Ceremonies I 
Liturgical Ceremonies II 

Liturgy Practicum: Eucharist 

& Homiletics 
Practicum in Liturgical Planning 



Liturgy Practicum: Sacraments 
Practicum in Preaching and 

Worship 
Offices of the Ministry 
Worship in the Church 

B. Preaching 

Preaching and Worship 
Seminar on Advanced Preaching 
Preaching Practicum 
Practicum in Preaching 

Section 1 

Section 2 

Sermon Design: Methods and 

Theory 
Theology of Preaching 
Ministry of Preaching I 
Ministry of Preaching II 
Preaching the Homily 
Practicum in Preaching and 

Worship 
Principles & Practice of 

Preaching I 
Principles & Practice of 

Preaching II 

Contemporary Evangelism 
Practicum in Team Retreats 
for Adults 



Persich, Fall, MW, 9:05 
Fischer, Fall, TBA 
Hartenbach, Winter & Spring, 
TBA 

Serrick, Fall, MW, 1-2:00 
Serrick, Fall, TuF, 1-2:30 
Winter, T, 1-2:30; Th, 1- 
2:00; Spring, TTh, 1-2:30 
Serrick. Spring, MF, 1-2:00 

Sut tier land. Spring, TBA 
Sutherland, Winter, TBA 
Enright, Winter, Th, 10:45-1:15 



Kennel. Winter. MW, 3:40-5:10 
Kennel. Spring, W, 2:10-4:40 
Kemper. Spring, TBA 

Skerry. Winter, TTh, 12-1:15 
Skerry. Spring, TTh, 10:30- 
11:45 

Skerry, Fall, MWF. 9:00 
Skerry, Fall, MW, 3:30-4:45 
Miller. Winter. TBA 
Miller, Spring, TBA 
Miller, Winter, TBA 

Sutherland, Spring. TBA 

Enright, Spring, Th, 10:45-1:15 

Archibald, Winter, Th, 9:30- 

12:00 
Brown, Fall, Th, 1:10-3:40 

Mainelli, Fall & Spring, TBA 
Robb, Winter, Th. 3:30-5:30 



C. Communications 



BTS 


C-371 




The Minister as Communicator 


+ BTS 


C-473 




Mass Communications, Society 
& the Church 


BTS 


C-477 




Faith and Film 


DeAn 


Spc 


313 


Basics of Communications 


DeAn 


Spc 


314 


Communication in Christian 
Assembly 


DeAn 


Spc 


323 


Oral Interpretation of God's 
Word 1 


DeAn 


Spc 


324 


Oral Interpretation of God's 
Word II 



Kennel, Fall, MW. 4:10-5:30 

Kennel, Fall. Th. 3:30-6:00 
Kennel, Spring. Th, 3:30-6:00 
Miller, Winter. Th. 9:05 

Miller, Spring. Th. 9:05 

Miller, Fall. TBA 

Miller, Winter. TBA 



40 



VIII. CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 



BIS 


C-490 




Development of Conscience 


CTU 


CMM 


561 


Educating Christians for Com- 
munal & Social Responsi- 
bility 


CTU 


CMM 


562 


The Sacraments and Christian 
Education 


DeAn 


Twp 


504 


Religious Education 



LSTC 



M/L 



RE 



MIN 



320 



383 



NBTS 


PMC 


503 


NBTS 


PMC 


504 


NBTS 


PMC 


507 


NBTS 


PMC 


506 


NBTS 


PMC 


501 


NBTS 


PMC 


502 



Seminar in Adult Christian 

Education 
Educational Dimension of 

Ministry 
Teaching Methods and Practice 
Teaching Children in the Church 
Group Process in the Church 
Educational Ministry with Adults 
Teaching Ministry of the Church 
Organization and Administra- 
tion of Christian Education 



Miller, Ww^xer. WF. 2:10-3:10 



Maine 1 11, Spring. MW. 2-3:15 

Maine Hi, Fall, MW. 2-3:15 
Gaydos/Piacitelli, Fall. Winter, 
Spring. TBA 

Maine Hi, Winter. TBA 

Williams, Winter. TBA 
Jenkins, Fall. WF, 1:10-2:30 
TBA, Fall, Th. 7-9:30 pm 
Jenkins, Fall, MW, 7-8:30 pm 
TBA, Winter. M. 7-9:30 pm 
Jenkins, Winter. MWF. 11:30 

Jenkins, Spring. M. 7-9:30 pm 



41 



FACULTY 



Old Testament Studies 

Reidar B. Bjornard, (NBTS), Cand. Theol. (University of Oslo); Th.D. (Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary); Graduate Study (Uppsala University and American School of Ori- 
ental Research, Jerusalem). 

Cher/an M. Curiyicad, S.J. (JSTC), Professor, Vidya Jyori Institute of Religious 
Studies, Delhi; S.T.L. (St. Mary's College. Kurseong); S.S.L. (Pontifical Biblical Institute, 
Rome). (Visiting Professor, Fall Quarter). 

Joseph J. DeVau/t, S.J., (JSTC). Secretary of the Theology Council; Litt. B. (Xavier 
University); Ph.L. (West Baden College); M.A. (Loyola University); S.T.L. (West Baden Col- 
lege); Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins University); S.S.L. (Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome). 

James A. Fischer, CM., (DeAn), A.B. (St. Mary's Seminary); S.T.L. (Catholic Univer- 
sity of America); S.S.L. (Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome). 



Thomas Fox, O.F.M. (CTU), S.T.B. (Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum. Rome); S.T.L. 
(Catholic University of America); D.Th. Cand. (Friedrich-Wilhelm University. Bonn, Ger- 
many). 

Wes/ey J. Fuerst, (LSTC). Dean of Faculty; A.B. (Midland College); B.D. (Central 
Lutheran Theological Seminary); Th.D. (Princeton Theological Seminary); Study (University 
of Eriangen). 

Andre Lacocque, (CTS). Director of the Center for Jewish-Christian Studies; D. Litt. 
(University of Strasbourg); D. Theol. (University of Strasbourg). 



Walter L. Michel, (LSTC). B.D. (Vienna. Heidelberg), M.A., Ph.D. (University of Wis- 
consin). Study (Heidelberg, Yale University). 



Robert W. Neff, (Beth), B.S. (Pennsylvania State University); B.D., M.A.. and Ph.D. 
(Yale University). (Sabbatical 1974-75) 



Andre M. Rousseau, CM.. (DeAn). M.A. (Grenoble); Ph.L. (Institut Catholique. Lyon); 
S.T.L. (Strasbourg); S.S.L. (Pontifical Biblical Institute. Rome). 



Carroll Stuhlmueller, C.P.. (CTU). S.T.L. (Catholic University of America); S.S.L. 
(The Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome); S.S.D. (The Pontifical Biblical Institute. Rome); 
D.H.L. (St Benedict College, honorary). (On leave Fall Quarter). 

Richard R. Syre, (LSTC), A.B. (University of Vienna); S.T.B. (New York Theological 
Seminary); S.T.M. (Lutheran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg); Study (Princeton Theologi- 
cal Seminary); Ph.D. (University of Nebraska); Litt.D. (Midland Lutheran College). (Sab- 
batical Spring Quarter.) 



42 



New Testament Studies 

Manfred T. Brauch, (NBTS). B.A. (Houghton College); B.D. (North American Baptist 
Seminary); Graduate Studies (UniversitSt Hamburg, and Theologisches Seminar der Deut- 
schen Baptisten); Th. M. (Princeton Theological Seminary); Ph.D. (McMaster University). 

James A. Fischer, CM., (DeAn), A.B. (St. Mary's Seminary); S.T.L. (The Catholic 
University of America); S.S.L. (Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome). 

Donald A. Hagner, (NBTS). A.B. (Northwestern University); B.D., Th., (Fuller Theo- 
logical Seminary); Ph.D. (University of Manchester). 

Gerald F. Hawthorne, (NBTS). A.B. (Wheaton); M.A. (Wheaton Graduate School); Ph.D. 
(University of Chicago). 

Robert Karris, O.F.M. (CTU), S.T.B. (Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum); S.T.L. (Cath- 
olic University of America); Th.D. (Harvard Divinity School). 

Callistus Langerholz, O.F.M., (CTU), S.T.L. (Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome); 
S.T.D. (Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome); L.G. (Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, 
Rome). 

Eugene A. Laverdiere, S.S.S., (JSTC). A.A. (Eymard College); M.A. (John Carroll Uni- 
versity); S.T.L. (University of Fribourg); S.S.L. (Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome); 
Eleve Titulaire (Ecole Biblique, Jerusalem); Ph.D. Cand. (University of Chicago). (Visiting 
Professor, Winter and Spring 1975) 

Wilhelm C. Linss, (LSTC), Director of Admissions; B.D. (Equiv. , University of Er- 
langen); Th.D. (Boston University School of Theology); Study (University of Milinster). 

Robert P. Meye, (NBTS). Academic Dean; B.A. (Stanford University); B.D., Th.M. 
(Fuller Theological Seminary); D.Theol. (University of Basel); Graduate Study (University 
of Zurich). (Sabbatical Winter Quarter) 

N. Leroy Norquist, (LSTC). A.B. (Augustana College); B.D. (Augustana Theologicall 
Seminary); S.T.M. (Wittenberg University); Ph.D. (Hartford Seminary Foundation) Study 
(Princeton Theological Seminary). (Sabbatical 1974-75) 

Andre M. Rousseau. CM,, (DeAn), M.A. (Grenoble); Ph.L. (Institute Catholique, Lyon); 
S.T.L. (Strasbourg); S.S.L. (Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome). 

Robin J. Scroggs, (CTS), B.A. (University of North Carolina); B. Music (University of 
North Carolina); B.D. (Duke University); Ph.D. (Princeton University). (Sabbatical, Fall 
Quarter) 

Donald Senior, C.P. (CTU). Bacculareate en Theologie (University of Louvain, Bel- 
guim); S.T.L., S.T.D. (University of Louvain). 

Graydon F. Snyder, (Beth), B.A. (Manchester College); B.D. (Bethany Theological 
Seminary); Th.D. (Princeton Theological Seminary); Study (Goettingen University. Ger- 
many); (University of Oslo. Norway); (Pontifical Institute of Christian Archaeology, Rome). 



Alphonse Spilly, C. PP. S., (CTU). M.A. (University of Dayton); Doctoral Candidate 
(University of Chicago). 



43 



William G. Thompson, S.J., (JSTC), Chairman, Department of Biblical Theology; A.B. 
(Loyola University); Ph.L. (West Baden College); M.A. (Loyola University); S.T.L. (West 
Baden College); S.S.L. (Pontificio Istituto Biblico); S.S.D. (Pontificio Istituto Biblico). 

David J. Wieand, (Beth), Continuing Education; B.A. (Juniata College); M.A. (New 
York University); B.D. (Bethany Theological Seminary); Ph.D. (University of Chicago); 
Study (Chicago Institute of Psychoanalysis); (National Training Laboratory, Bethel, Maine); 
(National Protestant Laboratory, Green Lake, Wisconsin); (American School of Oriental 
Research in Jerusalem); (Northeast Career Center, Princeton Theological Seminary); 
(Brook Lane Psychiatric Center, Hagerstown, Maryland). 

Arthur Vddbus, (LSTC). Cand. TheoL, Mag., Dr. Theol. (University of Tartu, Estonia). 
(Sabbatical Spring Quarter.) 



Jewish Studies 

Hayim Goren Perelmuter, (CTU), B.A. (McGill University, Montreal); M.H.L. (Jewish 
Institute of Religion, New York); D.H.L. Cand. (Hebrew Union College— Hebrew Univer- 
sity); D.D. (Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati, Honorary). 



Theology and Philosophy 

James L Adams, (M/L); S.T.B., M.A. (Harvard); Ph.D. (University of Chicago); Theol. 
D. (Marburg University). 

Eugene Ahner, S.V.D., (CTU). S.T.L. (Gregorian University, Rome); Ph.D. Cand. (Ford- 
ham University). 

Ricardo Antoncich, S.J., (JSTC), Professor, Universidad Catolica del Peru; Director, 
Peruvian Center for Social Investigation and Action (CIAS). (Visiting Professor, Winter 
Quarter) 

Carl E. Braaten, (LSTC) A.B. (St. Olaf College); B.Th. (Luther Theological Seminary); 
Th.D. (Harvard University); Fullbright Scholar (University of Paris, Sorbonne); Sinclair 
Kennedy Traveling Fellow (University of Heidelberg). (Sabbatical 1974-75) 

Dale W. Brown, (Beth), B.A. (McPherson College); B.D. (Bethany Theological Semi- 
nary); Ph.D. (Northwestern University); Study (Drake University, Divinity School). 

Ralph W. Burhoe, Director, Center of Advanced Study in Religion and Science. 

John J. Danagher, CM. (DeAn), J. CD. (St. Thomas University, Rome). 

Chetti Devasahayam, (NBTS); B.S. (Andhra University); B.D. (Serampore College); 
Th.M. and D.D. (Northern Baptist Theological Seminary). 

James J. Doyle, S.J., (JSTC), Chairman, Committee on Personnel and Faculty Studies; 
A.B. (St. Louis University); Ph.L. (West Baden College); S.T.L. (West Baden College); 
M.A. (University of Toronto); S.T.D. (L'Imaculee-Conception, Montreal). 



44 



I 



Edmund J. Fortman, S.J., (JSTC). A.B. (Loyola University, Chicago); Ph.L. (St. Louis 
University); M.A. (St. Louis University); S.T.L. (St. Mary's College. Kansas); S.T.D. 
(Gregorian University). 

Francis A. Gaydos, CM. (DeAn). Rector; A.B. (St. Mary's Seminary); M.A. (St. Louis 
University); S.T.D. (Collegio Angelico, Rome). 

V>/arren F. Groff, (Beth), Dean; B.A. (Juniata College); B.D. (Yale Divinity School); 
Ph.D. (Yale University); Study (Harvard University). 

Roger D. Haight, S.J., (JSTC), Professor, Ateneo de Manila University, B.A., M.A. 
(Berchmans College, Cebu); M.A., Ph.D. (University of Chicago). (Visiting Professor, 
Spring 1975) 

Zachary Hayes, O.F.M., (CTU), Dr. Theol. (Friederich-Wilhelm University, Bonn, Ger- 
many). (On leave Fall Quarter) 

Philip J. Hefner, (LSTC), A.B. (Midland Lutheran College); M.Div. (Chicago Lutheran 
Theological Seminary); M.A., Ph.D. (University of Chicago); Fulbright Scholar, (Tubingen). 

Theodore W. Jennings, Jr., (CTS), B.A. (Duke University); B.D. and Ph.D. (Emory 
University). 

Paul Knitter, S.V.D.. (CTU), S.T.B. (Gregorian University. Rome); S.T.L. (Gregorian 
University, Rome); Doctoral Studies (Gregorian University. Rome, and University of Mdin- 
ster); Dr. Theol. Des. (University of Marburg. Germany). 

Walter J. Kukkonen, (LSTC). B.S. (Northern Illinois University); B.D.. S.T.M., S.T.D. 
(Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary); Study (University of Helsinki). 

Perry D. LeFevre, (CTS), Academic Dean; B.A. (Harvard University); B.D. (Chicago 
Theological Seminary); Ph.D. (University of Chicago). 

Richard M. Leiiaert, O.S.C., (CTU), B.A. (St. Francis College); S.T.B. (Catholic Uni- 
versity of America); Ph.D. Cand. (Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley). 

Donald E. Miller, (Beth), M.A. (University of Chicago); B.D. (Bethany Theological 
Seminary); Ph.D. (Harvard University). 

Michael Montague, S.J., (JSTC), A.B. (Loyola University); Ph.L. (West Baden College); 
M.M. (Loyola University); S.T.L. (West Baden College); Ph.D. (St. Louis University). 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M.. (CTU). Academic Dean; S.T.L. (Pontifical Athenaeum Anton- 
ianum, Rome); S.T.D. (Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum. Rome); L.G. (Pontifical Athenaeum 
Antonianum, Rome); Study (Harvard Divinity School). 

Nicholas E. Persich, CM. (DeAn), Dean of Studies; A.B. (St. Mary's Seminary); S.T.D. 
(Collegio Angelico, Rome). 

Paul V. Robb, S.J.. (JSTC), Litt.B. (Xavier University); Ph.L. (West Baden College); 
M.A. (Loyola University, Chicago); S.T.L. (West Baden College); Ph.D. (Loyola Univer- 
sity, Chicago). 



45 



Robert J. Schreiter, C.PP.S., (CTU). B.A. (St. Joseph's College); Th.Drs. (Katholieke 
Universiteit, Nijmegen). 

W. Widick Schroeder, (CTS), B.A. (Bethel College; M.A. (Michigan State University); 
B.D. (Chicago Theological Seminary); Ph.D. (University of Chicago). 

Robert T. Sears, S.J., (JSTC), A.B. (Xavier University); Ph.L. (West Baden College); 
S.T.L. (Sankt Georgen, Frankfurt, Germany); Ph.D. (Fordham University). 

Franklin Sherman, (LSTC), Director of Graduate Studies; A.B. (Muhlenberg College); 
B.D. (Chicago Lutheran Seminary); M.A. (Oxford University); A.M., Ph.D. (University of 
Chicago). 

Robert I. Tobias, (LSTC), Director of Continuing Education; A.B. (Phillips University); 
M.A. (Graduate School of Theology, Phillips University); B.D. (Union Theological Semi- 
nary); Th.D. (University of Geneva and Graduate School of Ecumenical Studies). 

Roman Vanasse, O. Praem., (CTU), Director of M.A. Program; S.T.L. (Gregorian Uni- 
ve'-sity, Rome); S.T.D. (Gregorian); Study (Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago 
and the Pontifical Biblical Institute. Rome). 

Joseph F. Wulftange, S.J., (JSTC), Chairman, Department of Fundamental Theology; 
A.B. (Loyola University); M.A. (St. Louis University); Ph.L. (West Baden College); S.T.L. 
(West Baden College); M.S. (University of Minnesota); Ph.D. (Gregorian University). 

Warren Cameron Young, (NBTS), B.A. (Gordon College); B.D. (Northern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary); M.A., Ph.D. (Boston University); Graduate Study (University of Heidel- 
berg and University of Basel). (Sabbatical Winter and Spring Quarters) 



Historical Studies 

Dale W. Brown. (Beth), B.A. (McPherson College); B.D. (Bethany Theological Semi- 
nary); Ph.D. (Northwestern University); Study (Drake University, Divinity School). 

J. Patout Burns, S.J.. (JSTC), A.B.. M.A. (Spring Hill College), M.Div. (Regis College); 
Toronto); M.Th. (St. Michael's College, Toronto); M. Phil., Ph.D. (Yale Univeristy). 

Donald F. Durnbaugh, (Beth), A.B. (Manchester College); M.A. (University of Michi- 
gan); Ph.D. (University of Pennsylvania). 

Robert H. Fischer. (LSTC), A.B. (Gettysburg College); B.D. (Lutheran Theological 
Selninary, Gettysburg); Ph.D. (Yale University). 

Edmund J. Fortman, S.J., (JSTC), A.B. (Loyola University); Ph.L. (St. Louis Univer- 
sity); M.A. (St. Louis University); S.T.L (St. Mary's College, Kansas); S.T.D. (Gregorian 
University, Rome). 

John C. Godbey, (M/L), B.D. (Federated Theological Faculty, University of Chicago); 
M.A., Ph.D. (University of Chicago). 

William E. Hartenbach, CM., (DeAn). M.A. (Catholic University, Washington); Doc- 
toral Studies (Catholic University). 



46 



James Hennesey, S.J., (JSTC). President, B.A. (Loyola University); Ph.L.. S.T.L. 
Woodstock College); M.A.. Ph.D. (Catholic University, Washington). 

Thomas Joyce. C.M.F., (CTU). S.T.B. (Catholic University of America); Graduate 
Study (Loyola, L.A., and Notre Dame University); L.H.E. (Gregorian University, Rome); 
D.H.E. (Gregorian University, Rome). 

Walter J. Kukkonen, (LSTC). B.S. (Northern Illinois University); B.D.. S.T.M., S.T.D. 
(Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary); Study (University of Helsinki). 

William O. Madden, S.J., (JSTC), Assistant to the Dean; Chairman, Department of 
Historical Theology; Chairman, Committee on Statutes; A.B. (Loyola University); Ph.L. 
(West Baden College); M.A. (Loyola University); S.T.L. (West Baden College); H.E.L. 
(Gregorian University); H.E.D. (Gregorian University). 

Clyde L. Manschreck. (CTS), Director, Center for Reformation and Free Church Stud- 
ies; B.A. (George Washington University); B.D. (Garrett Theological Seminary); M.A. 
(Northwestern University); Ph.D. (Yale University). 

James C. May, (NBTS), B.A. (Northern Baptist Theological Seminary College); M.R.E., 
M.Div. (Northern Baptist Theological Seminary). 

Lawrence Nemer, S.V.D., (CTU), L. Miss. (Gregorian University, Rome); M.A. (Catho- 
lic University of America). (On leave for doctoral studies.) 

Eric H. Ohimann, (NBTS), B.A. (University of Alberta); B.D. (North American Baptist 
Seminary; Predigerseminar, Hamburg, Germany); Th.M. (Southern Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary); Th.D. (Graduate Theological Union). 

Theodore C. Ross, S.J,, (JSTC), Litt.B. (Xavier University); Ph.L. (West Baden Col- 
lege); M.A. (Loyola University); S.T.L. (Bellarmine School of Theology); M.A. (Theology) 
(Loyola University), 

James A. Scherer, (LSTC), A.B. (Yale University); B.D., Th.D. (Union Theological 
Seminary); Study (Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary; Columbia University; Interna- 
tional Christian University, Japan; Oxford University). 

James K. Serrick, S.J. (JSTC), A.B. (Loyola University); Ph.L. (West Baden College); 
S.T.L. (West Baden College); M.A. (University of Notre Dame). 

Jared Wicks, S.J.. (JSTC), Director of the Library; Litt.B. (Xavier University); Ph.L. 
(West Baden College); M.A. (Loyola University); S.T.L. (West Baden College); Th.D. 
(University of Milinster, Germany). 

Christian Ethics 

Norman E. Bevan, C.S.Sp., (CTU), B.D. (St. Mary's Seminary, Norwalk, CT); S.T.L. 
(Gregorian University, Rome); S.T.D. Cand. (Academia Alfonsiana, Rome). 

Robert Benne, LSTC, A.B. (Midland Lutheran College); M.A., Ph.D. (University of Chi- 
cago); Study (University of Eriangen). 

Dismas Bonner, O.F.M.. (CTU). J.C.L. (Catholic University of America); J. CD. 
(Catholic University of America). 



47 



Dale W. Brown, (Beth). B.A. (McPherson College); B.D. (Bethany Theological Semir 
nary); Ph.D. (Northwestern University); Study (Drake University, Divinity School). 

John R. Connery, S.J., (JSTC), Director, Continuing Education; Litt.B. (Xavier Univer- 
sity); M.A. (Loyola University, Chicago); S.T.L. (West Baden College); S.T.D. (Gregorian 
University). 

John J. Danagher, CM. (DeAn), J. CD. (University of St. Thomas, Rome). 

J. Ronald Engel, (M/L). B.D. (Meadville Theological School); Ph.D. Cand. (University 
of Chicago, Divinity School). 

John A. Gallagher, S.J., (JSTC). A.B. (Loyola University); Ph.L. (West Baden Col- 
lege); M.Div. (Regis College, Toronto). 

Francis A. Gaydos, CM. (DeAn), Rector; A.B. (St. Mary's Seminary); M.A. (St. Louis 
University); S.T.D. (Collegio Angelico. Rome). 

Dam/en Isabell, O.F.M., (CTU), S.T.B. (Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome); 
S.T.L. (Gregorian University, Rome); S.T.D. (Gregorian University, Rome). 

Donald E. Miller, (Beth), M.A. (University of Chicago); B.D. (Bethany Theological 
Seminary); Ph.D. (Harvard University). 

Sebastian MacDonald, C.P., (CTU), S.T.L. (University of St. Thomas, Rome); S.T.D. 
(University of St. Thomas, Rome); Study (Princeton University). 

J. Robert Meyners, (CTS), B.D. (Chicago Theological Seminary); Th.D. (Union Theo- 
logical Seminary). 

Robert E. Murray, S.J., (JSTC), A.B. (Loyola University); Ph.L., S.T.L. (West Baden 
College); S.T.D. (Gregorian University, Rome). (Academic Leave 1974-76) 

Randolph Nelson, (LSTC), B.A. (Gustavus Adolphus College); B.D. (Lutheran School 
of Theology at Chicago); Ph.D. Cand. (University of Chicago). 

John J. O'Callaghan, S.J., (JSTC), Chairman, Committee on Comprehensive Examina- 
tions; A.B. (Loyola University); Ph.L. (West Baden College); M.A., (Loyola University); 
S.T.L. (West Baden College); S.T.D. (Gregorian University). 

John Pawlikowski, O.S.M., (CTU), A.B. (Loyola University, Chicago); Ph.D. (Univer- 
sity of Chicago). 

Nicholas E. Persich, CM. (DeAn), Dean of Studies; A.B. (St. Mary's Seminary); 
S.T.D. (Collegio Angelico, Rome). 

W. Widick Schroeder, (CTS), B.A. (Bethel College); M.A. (Michigan State University); 
B.D. (Chicago Theological Seminary); Ph.D. (University of Chicago). 

Franklin Sherman, (LSTC), A.B. Director of Graduate Studies; (Muhlenberg College); 
B.D. (Chicago Lutheran Seminary); M.A. (Oxford University); A.M., Ph.D. (University of 
Chicago). 



48 



\Narren Cameron Young, (NBTS). B.A. (Gordon College); B.D. (Northern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary); M.A. Ph.D. (Boston University); Graduate Study (University of Heidel- 
berg and University of Basel) (Sabbatical Winter and Spring Quarters) 



Pastoral Care and Ministry 

Philip A. Anderson, (CTS), B.A. (Macalester College); B.D. (Chicago Theological 
Seminary); Ph.D. (University of Edinburgh). 

Bryan F. Archibald, (NBTS). President; B.Sc. (Acadia University); B.D. (Colgate 
Rochester Divinity School); D.D. (Keuka College); Graduate Study (Boston University). 

Dismas Bonner, O.F.M.. (CTU), J.C.L. (Catholic University of America); J. CD. 
(Catholic University of America). 

Noble L. Butler, (NBTS). B.A. (Baylor University); B.D. (Southwestern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary); Ph.D. (Boston University); Graduate Study (Topeka State Hospital and 
Menninger Foundation). 

Lynn /?. Buzzard, (NBTS). B.A., M.A.T.. M.Div (Duke University); S.T.D. Cand. (San 
Francisco Theological Seminary). 

Lois Dideon, R.C.. (CTU). A.B. (Seattle University); M.A. in Theology (Andover-New- 
ton Theological School). 

Arthur L. Foster, (CTS), Director, Center for Theology and the Study of Man; B.A. 
(McMaster University); B.D. (McMaster University. Divinity School); Ph.D. (University of 
Chicago). 

Dennis Geaney, O.S.A., (CTU), Director of Field Education; M.A. (Catholic Univer- 
sity of America). 

James W. Heisig, S.V.D., (CTU), M.A. (Loyola University, Chicago); M.Th. (Notre 
Dame University); Ph.D. (Cambridge). 

Damien Isabell, O.F.M.. (CTU). S.T.B. (Pontifical Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome); 
S.T.L. (Gregorian University. Rome); S.T.D. (Gregorian University. Rome), 

Walter J. Kukkonen, (LSTC); B.S. (Northern Illinois University); M.Div., S.T.M., S.T.D. 
(Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary); Study (University of Helsinki). 

Eugene A. Mainelli, O.P., (JSTC). Coordinator, Ministerial Program; M.A. (Aquinas 
Institute of Theology); D.Min. (Chicago Theological Seminary). 

Robert W. Mallonee, S.V.D.. (CTU), M.A. (Loyola University); M.A.L.S. (Rosary Col- 
lege, River Forest, III.); CPE Training (Lutheran General Hospital and Wisconsin School 
for Boys); D.Min. (Chicago Theological Seminary). 

Thomas More Newbold, C.P., (CTU), Maitre-es-Sc-Med. (L'Institut d'Etude Medieval 
d'Albert le Grand); Ph.D. (University of Montreal, Montreal. Canada). (Sabbatical Winter 
and Spring Quarters) 

Nicholas E. Persich, CM. (DeAn), Dean of Studies; A.B. (St. Mary's Seminary); 
S.T.D. (Collegio Angelico. Rome). 



49 



Henry J. Piacitelli, CM., (DeAn), Director, Training in Pastoral Works; A.B. (St. 
Mary's Seminary); M.A. (Catholic University of America); S.T.M. (University of Dubuque). 

Paul M. Robinson, (Beth), President; B.A. (Juniata College); Th.B. (Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary); S.T.M. (Lutheran Seminary at Philadelphia); Study (Cambridge Univer- 
sity). 

Byron P. Royer, (Beth), Director, Clinical Field Education; B.S. (Manchester College); 
B.D. (Bethany Theological Seminary); M.A. (Northwestern University); M.A. and Ph.D. 
(University of Chicago). 

Carl Schneider, (M/L), B.D. (Union Theological Seminary), Ph.D. (Harvard University). 

Robert C. Schultz, CM. (DeAn), M.Div. (Concordia Seminary); Th.D. (Friedrich Alex- 
ander University, Eriangen, Germany); Postgraduate Study (Harvard and Menninger Founda- 
tion). 

Neil H. Shadle, (M/L), B.D. (Meadvi lie/Lombard Theological School). 



Donald Skerry, S.V.D., (CTU). S.T.L. (Gregorian University, Rome); S.T.D. (Gregorian 
University. Rome); M.A. Cand. in Speech (Northwestern University). 

Paul R. Swanson, (LSTC), A.B. (Augustana College); B.D. (Augustana Theological 
Seminary); S.T.M. (Andover-Newton Theological School); Ph.D. (Boston University). 

Marjorie Tuite, O.P., (JSTC), Coordinator. Ministerial Program; A.B. (Ohio Dominican); 
M.A. (Fordham); M.A. (Manhattan). 

Dennis H. van Lier, S.J., (JSTC), Ph.L. (Berchmanianum, Nijmegen); M.A. (University 
of Amsterdam); S.T.L. (Canisianum, Maastricht); S.T.M., D.Min. (Andover Newton Theo- 
logical School). 

Peggy Way, (JSTC), Coordinator. Ministerial Program; A.B. (University of Michigan); 
B.D. (University of Chicago); M.S.W. (Wayne State University). 

World Mission and Ecumenics 

John Boberg, S.V.D., (CTU), S.T.L. (Gregorian University, Rome); D.Miss. (Gregorian 
University. Rome). 

Norman E. Bevan, C.S.Sp., (CTU), B.D. (St. Mary's Seminary. Norwalk. CT); S.T.L. 
(Gregorian University, Rome); S.T.D. Cand. (Academia Alfonsiana, Rome). 

Chetti Devasahayam, (NBTS); B.S. (Andhra University); B.D. (Serampore College); 
Th.M. and D.D. (Northern Baptist Theological School). 

John A. Hardon. S.J., (JSTC) Research Professor. A.B. (John Carroll University); M.A. 
(Loyola University); S.T.L. (West Baden College); S.T.D. (Gregorian University). 

James W. Heisig, S.V.D., (CTU), M.A. (Loyola University, Chicago); M.Th. (Notre 
Dame University); Ph.D. (Cambridge). 

David L. Lindberg, (LSTC), Director of Field Education; A.B. (Gustavus Adolphus Col- 
lege); M.Div. (Augustana Theological Seminary); M.A., Ph.D. (University of Chicago). 



50 



James C. May, (NBTS); B.A. (Northern Baptist Seminary College); M.R.E.. M.Div. 
(Northern Baptist Theological Seminary). 



James A. Scherer, (LSTC). A.B. (Yale University); B.D.. Th.D. (Union Theological 
Seminary, New York); Study (Chicago Theological Seminary; Columbia University; Inter- 
national Christian University, Japan; Oxford University). 



Preaching and Worship 

William G. Enright, (NBTS), A.B. (Wheaton College); B.D. (Fuller Theological Semi- 
nary); Th.M. (McCormick Theological Seminary); Ph.D. (University of Edinburgh). 

William E. Hartenbach, CM., (DeAn), M.A. and Doctoral Studies (Catholic University, 
Washington). 

Basil Johnson, O.F.M., (CTU), A.B. (Quincy College); B.Mus. (DePaul University); 
M.A. In Liturgy (Catholic University of America); S.T.D. Cand. (Institut Cathol ique de 
Paris). 



LeRoy E. Kennel, (Beth), B.A. (Goshen College); M.A. (State University of Iowa); 
B.D. (Goshen College Biblical Seminary); Ph.D. (Michigan State University). 



Axel C. Kildegaard, (LSTC), A.B. (State University of Iowa); Cand. Theol. (Grand 
View Seminary); S.T.M. (Yale University). 

Oscar J. Miller, CM.. (DeAn), A.B. (St. Mary's Seminary); M.A. in Speech (North- 
western University). 

Morris J. Niedenthal, (LSTC), B.S. (Northwestern University); B.D. (Chicago Lutheran 
Theological Seminary); Th.D. (Union Theological Seminary); Fullbright Scholar (Manches- 
ter University, England). (Sabbatical Fall Quarter). 



James K. Serrick, S.J., (JSTC), A.B. (Loyola University); Ph.L. (West Baden College); 
S.T.L. (West Baden College); M.A. (University of Notre Dame). 



Donald Skerry, S.V.D., (CTU). S.T.L. (Gregorian University. Rome); S.T.D. (Gregorian 
University, Rome); M.A. Cand. in Speech (Northwestern University). 



Malcolm R. Sutherland, (M/L), President; M.S. (School of Applied Social Science, 
Western Reserve University); B.D. (Meadville Theological School and Federated Theologi- 
cal Faculty, University of Chicago). 



51 



Christian Education 

Jean Bozeman, (LSTC), B.A. (Lenoir Rhyne College); M.A. (Temple University). 

Ernest Alfred Jenkins, (NBTS). B.A. (Wheaton College); B.D. (Northern Baptist Theo- 
logical Seminary); M.A., Ph.D. (University of Chicago). 

Donald E. Miller, (Beth). M.A. (University of Chicago); B.D. (Bethany Theological 
Seminary); Ph.D. (Harvard University). 

Ross Snyder, (CTS), B.A. (Ohio State University); M.A. (Boston University); Ed.D. 
(Teachers College of Columbia University). 

Jean S. Williams, (M/L); M.A. (Chicago Theological Seminary); M.S. (Purdue Univer- 
sity). 



Librarians 

Lowell C. Albee, Acting Director of Library; (LSTC); A.B. (Upsala College); B.D. (Au- 
gustana Theological Seminary); M.A. (Simmons College, School of Library Science); Study 
(Andover Newton Theological School). 

Joan Blocher. Assistant Librarian, (CTS); B.A. (University of Redlands); M.A.L.S. 
(Rosary College). 

Forrest Clark, Librarian (NBTS); B.S. (Middle Tennessee State University); M.S.L.S. 
(University of North Carolina). 

Arlene Feiner, Librarian, (JSTC); B.A. (Alverno College); M.A.L.S. (Rosary College). 

Francis Germovnik, CM., Librarian, (DeAndreis); J. CD. (Angel icum, Rome); M.A.L.S. 
(Rosary College). 

Myron Gohmann, CP., Associate Director of Library, (CTU); L. Hist. E. (Gregorian 
University, Rome); M.A.L.S. (Rosary Col lege). 

Albert Hurd, Librarian, (CTS); B.A. (University of Michigan); M.A. Cand. (University 
of Chicago). 

Elinor C. Johnson. Associate Librarian (LSTC); A. B. (Augustana College); M.A. (Uni- 
versity of Chicago). 

Joel W. Lundeen, Director of Library, (LSTC); A.B. (Augustana College); B.D. (Augus- 
tana Theological Seminary); M.A. (University of Chicago). (On leave, 1974-75) 

Kenneth O'Malley, C.P., Director of Library, (CTU); M.A.L.S. (University of Michigan). 
(On leave for doctoral studies) 

Murray L. Wagner, Librarian and Instructor in Bibliography, (Beth), B.A. (Manchester 
College); B.D. (Bethany Theological Seminary); Th.D. (Chicago Theological Seminary). 



52 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

CLUSTER LIBRARY SERVICES 

The Cluster supports a vigorous Library Program that provides many benefits to stu- 
dents and faculty. Rapid access to over 580,000 volumes in theology and related subject 
areas is available by an interlibrary teletype and courier network. A Union List of 1400 
current periodicals assists Cluster library users in locating desired titles that can then be 
delivered in hard copy from another Cluster library upon request. A staff of fourteen lib- 
rary professionals with various specializations are available to assist with reference work 
and library research problems. Joint access to other Cluster libraries is provided for by 
a Cluster I.D. The Cluster libraries have uniform policies for loan periods, use of reserve 
books, reference books, periodicals and costs for photocopying. Beyond the Cluster library 
resources are those of other Chicago area seminaries, the Chicago Public Library, New- 
berry Library and John Cresas. 

Other Cluster library cooperative programs that benefit library users are a coordinat- 
ed joint acquisitions program for books and periodicals. A joint acquisitions list— Current 
Acquisitions for Theological Education— is published six times a year and distributed to 
Cluster library users interested in current theological bibliography. Users at the Lutheran 
and Jesuit School libraries can access a union catalog of Cluster holdings since July 1972. 

Each Cluster library has its special subject strengths or collections. Below is a brief 
description of these kinds of collections found in the Cluster: 

Bethany: Special strengths in Brethren history. Pietism, peace studies, and psychological 
journals. Special collections are the Abraham H. Cassell Collection of 19th century his- 
torical and theological books and pamphlets. And the Huston Bible Collection which rep- 
resents over four hundred volumes with numerous editions of the English Bible. 

Catholic Theological Union: Special Collection strength in the subjects of Scripture, pat- 
rology, canon law, and missiology. 

Chicago Theological Seminary: Collection strength in ethics, sociology of religion, psy- 
chology and personality sciences. Special collections are in Congregational and Puritan 
studies and Hebraica. 

DeAndreis Seminary: Collection strength in Vincentiana, Scripture and Catholic Church his- 
tory. 

Jesuit School of Theology: Special collection strengths in Jesuistica, modern and contem- 
porary continental philosophy, patristics, medieval scholastic theology and Catholic sys- 
tematic theology. 

Lutheran School of Theology: Collection strength in Church History, theology, Lutheran Or- 
thodoxy, Pietism, and recent contenental theology. Special collections of published and 
unpublished materials related to the history of the Lutheran Church in America, United 
Lutheran Church, Augustana Evangelical Lutheran Church, American Evangelical Lutheran 
Church (Danish), and the Finnish Evangelical Lutheran Church (Suomi Synod). Gruber Col- 
lection of Greek MSS from the 9th-15th centuries; early editions of German and English 
Bibles. 

Meadvi lie/Lombard Theological School: Collection strengths in Unitarian materials, so- 
cial ethics and history of religions. 

Northern Baptist Theological Seminary: Collection strengths in Baptist History. Special- 
collections consist of Baptist Association records, American Baptist Convention records, 
Danish and Norwegian Baptist Seminary material; A.T. Olmstead Collection in Ancient • 
Near Eastern Languages and Literature. 



53 



CENTER FOR ADVANCED STUDY IN RELIGION AND SCIENCE (CASIRAS) 

The Center for Advanced Study in Religion and Science (CASIRAS), an independent 
and interdisciplinary institute of scholars, and the Chicago Cluster have formed a closer 
working relationship based on four previous years of active collaboration. The stated 
purposes of this relationship are the following: 

1. Mutual cooperation to achieve greater integration of scientific views of man and 
his world with the convictions by which men make their fundamental decisions; thereby 
to revitalize and universalize the long-evolving wisdom and power inherent in the religious 
dimension of culture; 

2. Cooperation in the development of curricula, study programs, and other means to 
establish such integration; 

3. Cooperation in the development of conferences, seminars, and lecture programs on 
these matters, as well as in the publication of Zygon, Journal of Religion and Science. 

The opportunity for guided research and study in the area of theology and science is 
unique among American theological schools. Mr. Ralph W. Burhoe, director of CASIRAS and 
editor of Zygon, serves as consultant to the Cluster schools in this area. 

THE CENTER FOR STUDIES IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 
Center Ministries and Offerings 

The Center is a ministerial and educational organization which: 

• provides courses within its competence to teachers in-service, parishes, seminar- 

ians, the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools, and to religious education degree 
candidates; 

• conducts the Pastoral Teacher Education clinical programs in and for schools and 
parishes, and as a supplement or alternative to the CPE experience for seminarians; 

• does consulting, research, writing, lecturing, and experimenting in the field of Chris- 
tian education; and 

• offers faculty or parish staff workshops or retreats, parish renewal programs, and 
specially tailored programs for unique situations in the church. 

The Center has an interdenominational Board of Directors, some twelve professional 
and ministerial associates with varying competencies, and a permanent staff: Paul J. Wier- 
enga, O.P.. M.A. (Aquinas Institute), M.R.E. (McCormick Theological Seminary); and Eugene 
A. Mainelli, O.P., M.A. (Aquinas Institute), D.Min. (CTS). 

Courses Offered By The Center, 1974-1975 

Three courses will be offered in 1974-1975, one each quarter, in cooperation with and 
under the sponsorship of LSTC and CTU. For LSTC, a course in Adult Christian Education 
(Winter); and for CTU, two courses: The Sacraments and Christian Education (Fall), and Ed- 
ucating Christians for Social Responsibility (Spring). These courses are listed under Sec- 
tion VIM, page 41. Students from other Cluster schools, colleges or agencies must apply 
directly to the Center for admission to these courses. 

also: 

CSRE 412 Tutorial and Guided Reading in Chosen Areas (by arrangement any quarter) 

Clinical Programs Offered By The Center 
CSRE 500 Pastoral Teacher Education for Educational Agencies or Schools (PTE-S) 

An intensive clinical internship program for one quarter or one semester full-time, 
designed to develop under cooperative supervision the practical, critical, and 



54 



pastoral abilities required for effective educating in religion relative to more for- 
mal educational settings. 

CSRE 505 Pastoral Teacher Education for Parishes (PTE-P) 

Internship in a parish under supervision of the Center and parish staff and dir- 
rected at all educational functioning, including preaching, teaching, group work, 
and at all age levels, 

CSRE 510 Advanced Pastoral Teacher Education (ARTE) 

Designed for and restricted to those who have had PIE or at least three years of 
ministerial experience. 

PIE and ARTE include extensive teaching and ministerial involvement, cooperative 
supervision, seminars, peer group interaction, personal counseling, and intensive theo- 
logical and pastoral reflection in a situation providing a broad base of experience. Pro- 
grams are structured on the principle that adults are their own best educators toward the 
maximization of their own abilities. PIE and ARTE are equivalent to nine quarter hours cred- 
it or three units. Arrangements to take PIE or ARTE must be made directly with the Center 
before May 20 of the previous academic year, and acceptance is contingent on an inter- 
view, fulfillment of all specifications, formal approval by the school or agency from which 
the candidate comes, and the registration fee of $100.00, which is counted as part of the 
tuition and may be refunded if the registrant's fees are paid by the placement institution. 

Information 

Enrollment in Center courses (three quarter hours each) takes place at the regular 
registration periods. Tuition for Center courses, unless otherwise indicated or sponsored, 
is $150.00. For PTE and ARTE, it is $450.00, with clinical placement institutions providing 
part or all expenses for the student, if necessary. Students in Center courses and programs 
can also receive academic credit through the Aquinas Institute School of Theology, Du- 
buque, Iowa, of which the Center is an affiliate. 

For more detailed information, write or call, 1100 East 55th;Street, Chicago, IL, 60615. 
Phone: (312) 947-9737 or 369-6370. 



THE CHICAGO CENTER FOR BLACK RELIGIOUS STUDIES (CCBRS) 



The Chicago Center for Black Religious Studies is an independent, ecumenical and 
non-sectarian corporation engaged in research and training for Black/Urban theological 
education. The Center seeks to educate people without regard to race in order to serve and 
minister to those of the black ethos and to encourage black persons to enter the Christian 
ministry. The Center is under the direction of the Reverend John R. Porter, and is located 
at 935 East 50th Street. Chicago, IL 60615 (telephone: (312) 624-2718). 

Program for 1974-75 

FALL QUARTER 1 974 

400 TBE - Theology of the Black Experience, Sept. 27-29. 1974 

400 WTMD - White Theology and Manifest Destiny, Oct. 4-6, 1974 

300 Methods: Seminar in Black Theological Methodology (by arr. - 1 hr. credit) 

300 IS/Corr: Indep. Study or Correspondence Comprehensives in Black Theology 

WINTER QUARTER 1975 

400 BBE - Bible and the Black Experience. Jan. 10-12, 1975 

400 SBE - Sociology of the Black Experience, Jan. 17-19. 1975 

300 Methods: Seminar in Black Theological Methodology (by arr. - 1 hr. credit) 



55 



300 PP: -Preaching- Intro, to Black Preaching (by arr. - 2-3 hrs. credit) 

300 IS/Corr: Indep. Study or Correspondence Comprehensives in Black Theology 

SPRING QUARTER 1975 

400 RMCT - Research Methods and Communications Tech., April 18-20, 1975 

400 BMHRF - Black Mental Health and Religious Faith, April 25-27, 1975 

300 Methods: Seminar in Black Theological Methodology (by arr. - 1 hr. credit) 

300 IS/Corr: Indep. Study or Correspondence Comprehensives in Black Theology 

300 CPH - Clinical Pastoral Healing in the Black Community (by arr.) 

The 400 level courses above all require 1) an interschool or dual enrollment with 
CCBRS and an accrediting institution, 2) completion of a contextual project, 3) a take- 
home examination, 4) organizing an evaluating committee of 2-4 persons. 

Lectures, team-taught courses, interim modules, and other course experiences can be 
brokered through CCBRS by groups and institutions. 



CROSS CULTURAL AND WORLD MISSION STUDIES 



intensive quarter in Cross-Cultural Communication (see page 18). courses, colloquies 
among foreign students, and a one week institute for missionaries on furlough to be held 
on April 6-12, 1975. The program is designed to provide specialized theological and 
cultural preparation to communicate the Gospel in a culture or subculture other than one's 
own, and to make students of theology generally aware of the worldwide mission of the 
church by giving them a deeper understanding of communication across cultural boun- 
daries. 



MODERN LANGUAGE COURSES 

In addition to the courses in Biblical languages listed among the regular course of- 
ferings, non-credit courses in German and French will be offered during the Winter Quarter. 
The object of these courses is to assist students in achieving a facility in reading theo- 
logical literature in these languages and thus fulfill language requirements for certain de- 
gree programs. A nominal fee will be charged. 



56 



The Chic^ Cluster ofTlieolqgical Schools 

sharing resources to prepare the minister for tomorrow — a wide variety of courses 
and degree programs - an ecumenical setting - special strengths in urban minis- 
try, world mission, and theology and the sciences — reciprocal library services 
in eight schools - quality theological education in an exciting city 

HYDE PARK 




OAK BROOK 




Oak Brook 
Lemont 



LEMONT 



De Andrei s Seminary 



H 



L 



Chicago 

A 



127th St. 



LEGEND 
Chicago (Hyde Park) 

1. Lutheran School of Theology 

(Cluster Offices) 

2. Jesuit School of Theology 

3. Meadvi He/Lombard Theological 

School 

4. Chicago Theological Seminary 

5. Catholic Theological Union 

X University of Chicago 
Oak Brook 

6. Bethany Theological Seminary 

7. Northern Baptist Theological 

Seminary 

Lemont 

8. DeAndreis Seminary 



^